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The Mets' Citi Field in New York City on July 30. Photo: Mike Stobe/Getty Images

Multiple professional sports teams are considering facial recognition systems to make admitting fans to stadiums as touchless as possible during the coronavirus pandemic, Wall Street Journal report.

Why it matters: It is unlikely that fans will be able to return to live sporting events soon unless facilities adopt measures, like touchless admission systems, to prevent the spread of the virus.

How it works: The New York Mets and the Los Angeles Football Club are testing facial recognition technology in their stadiums, according to the WSJ.

  • Los Angeles FC is trying an app called Clear, made by Alclear, that would let fans take and upload a selfie to their accounts and link it to their existing Ticketmaster profiles.
  • At the stadium, one camera would measure the fan’s temperature, while a second would determine whether the fan is wearing a mask. The fan would pull down their face covering to allow the camera see their faces and admit them if they have purchased a ticket.
  • The Mets are using Alclear’s recognition system to authenticate players and staff as they enter the stadium and take their temperatures. The MLB team is considering using the technology for admissions as well.

The big picture: In their current form, stadiums could be the perfect environment for COVID-19 to spread because of the proximity of fans.

Go deeper: Cardinals-Brewers game postponed again

Go deeper

Oct 15, 2020 - Podcasts

The rapid rise of COVID in Europe

The European Union is seeing more coronavirus cases than the U.S. as a proportion of population. Now, a number of European countries — like France, Italy and the U.K. — have reimposed lockdown measures to contain the virus.

Updated 21 mins ago - World

Russian police detain over 3,000 protesters demanding Navalny's release

Russian police officers beat protestesters at a rally against of jailing of oppositon leader Alexei Navalny in Moscow on Saturday. Photo: Mikhail Svetlov/Getty Images

Police in Russia on Saturday arrested more than 3,300 people as protesters nationwide demanded that opposition leader Alexey Navalny be released from jail.

Details: Demonstrations began in the eastern regions of Russia and spread west to more than 60 cities.

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Arizona Republicans censure Cindy McCain and GOP governor

Combination images of Cindy McCain and Gov. Doug Ducey. Photo: FilmMagic/FilmMagic for U.S.VETS/Michael Brochstein/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Arizona Republican Party members voted on Saturday to censure prominent GOP figures Cindy McCain, Gov. Doug Ducey and former Sen. Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.), who've all faced clashes with former President Trump.

Why it matters: Although the resolution is symbolic, this move plus the re-election of the Trump-endorsed Kelli Ward as state GOP chair shows the strong hold the former president has on the party in Arizona, despite President Biden winning the state in the 2020 election.