Sign up for our daily briefing

Make your busy days simpler with Axios AM/PM. Catch up on what's new and why it matters in just 5 minutes.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Twin Cities

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa Bay news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa Bay

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Charlotte news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Charlotte

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Students get off a Black Votes Matter bus in Fayetteville, N.C., in March. Photo: Melissa Sue Gerrits/Getty Images

The coronavirus has complicated the get-out-the-vote effort for Black churches in 2020.

Why it matters: Those churches are a key part of broader efforts in the Black community to push back against voter suppression tactics, the AP reports.

  • Churches have organized socially distant caravans with greatly reduced transportation capacity for early voting and Election Day ballot-casting.
  • Church volunteers are phone-banking and canvasing the homes of their members to ensure mail-in and absentee ballots are requested and hand-delivered to election board offices or drop boxes before the deadlines.
  • Many churches are still forced to hold virtual services, limiting their organizational might.

"It's not whether there are enough votes out there," said Cliff Albright, a co-founder of Black Voters Matter.

  • "It's whether we have the strategy, the resources and the election protection to make sure that the voters who want to show up are actually able to do so and be counted."

Flashback: "Souls to the polls" traces back to the 1955 assassination of the Rev. George Lee, a Black Mississippi entrepreneur, by white supremacists after he helped nearly 100 Black residents register to vote.

  • The cemetery where Lee is buried has served as a polling place.

The bottom line: Some Black Americans say they want to vote in person because of President Trump's overt campaign against mail-in voting.

  • "I'm now determined more than ever to go to the polls and cast my ballot in person, as opposed to by mail," said 53-year-old Jane Bonner of Georgia.

Go deeper

Felix Salmon, author of Capital
Dec 19, 2020 - Economy & Business

Why the racial homeownership gap persists

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Photos: H. Armstrong Roberts (Classicstock), Cliff de Bear (Newsday RM), Lambert/Getty Images

The homeownership gap between Black and white Americans is worse today than when race-based housing laws and policies were in effect decades ago.

Why it matters: Decades of unequal access to mortgage financing have had a predictable effect: Non-white Americans have much lower homeownership rates, lower wealth and a higher degree of financial precarity. This is especially true among Black Americans.

Ina Fried, author of Login
35 mins ago - Technology

CES was largely irrelevant this year

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Forced online by the pandemic and overshadowed by the attack on the Capitol, the 2021 edition of CES was mostly an afterthought as media's attention focused elsewhere.

Why it matters: The consumer electronics trade show is the cornerstone event for the Consumer Technology Association and Las Vegas has been the traditional early-January gathering place for the tech industry.

The FBI is tracing a digital trail to Capitol rioters

Illustration: Sarah Grillo

Capitol rioters, eager to share proof of their efforts with other extremists online, have so far left a digital footprint of at least 140,000 images that is making it easier for federal law enforcement officials to capture and arrest them.

The big picture: Law enforcement's use of digital tracing isn't new, and has long been at the center of fierce battles over privacy and civil liberties. The Capitol siege is opening a fresh front in that debate.

You’ve caught up. Now what?

Sign up for Mike Allen’s daily Axios AM and PM newsletters to get smarter, faster on the news that matters.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!