Jan 31, 2020 - Technology

George Soros: Zuckerberg "should not be left in control of Facebook"

George Soros and Mark Zuckerberg. Photos: Sean Gallup/Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Democratic megadonor George Soros ripped into Mark Zuckerberg and Facebook's decision to not fact check 2020 political ads in a Friday morning New York Times op-ed.

"I believe that Mr. Trump and Facebook's chief executive, Mark Zuckerberg, realize their interests are aligned — the president's in winning elections, Mr. Zuckerberg's in making money ... Facebook's decision not to require fact-checking for political candidates' advertising in 2020 has flung open the door for false, manipulated, extreme and incendiary statements."
— George Soros

What he's saying: Soros suggested that Zuckerberg and COO Sheryl Sandberg "follow only one guiding principle: maximize profits irrespective of the consequences."

  • "I expressed my fear that with Facebook’s help, Mr. Trump will win the 2020 election. The recent hiring of a right-wing figure to help manage its news tab has reinforced those fears."

The bottom line: "The responsible approach is self-evident. Facebook is a publisher not just a neutral moderator or 'platform.' It should be held accountable for the content that appears on its site," Soros wrote.

  • "One way or another, [Zuckerberg and Sandberg] should not be left in control of Facebook."

The big picture: Soros is one of many voices calling for Facebook to either be broken up or for Zuckerberg to step down as chief executive.

Go deeper: Rivals distance themselves from Facebook on political ads

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