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A nuTonomy test vehicle in Boston. Photo: nuTonomy

Following the death Sunday of a pedestrian struck by an Uber self-driving car, some companies are halting their own autonomous vehicle testing, Among those who is halting testing is nuTonomy, which says it did so at the request of the city of Boston. Uber also halted its testing, as has Toyota, per Bloomberg.

Why it matters: The first death caused by a self-driving car was sure to shake up the industry, despite arguments that self-driving cars are significantly safer than humans behind the wheel.

From nuTonomy: “We are working with City of Boston officials to ensure that our automated vehicle pilots continue to adhere to high standards of safety. We have complied with the City of Boston's request to temporarily halt autonomous vehicle testing on public roads.”

Ford: "We have no plans to change our testing operations at this time," a spokesman told Axios.

Toyota: “Because we feel the incident may have an emotional effect on our test drivers, we have decided to temporarily pause our Chauffeur mode testing on public roads,” Toyota told Bloomberg in a statement.

But, but, but: GM has said there are no changes to its plan to roll out a commercial service in 2019.

Axios has contacted other companies and will update if we hear back.

Go deeper

Updated 33 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Health: Coronavirus cases rose 10% in the week before Thanksgiving.
  2. Politics: Supreme Court backs religious groups on New York coronavirus restrictions.
  3. World: Expert says COVID vaccine likely won't be available in Africa until Q2 of 2021 — Europeans extend lockdowns.
  4. Economy: The winners and losers of the COVID holiday season.
  5. Education: National standardized tests delayed until 2022.
3 hours ago - Health

Standardized testing becomes another pandemic victim

Photo: Edmund D. Fountain for The Washington Post via Getty

National standardized reading and math tests have been pushed from next year to 2022, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) announced Wednesday.

Why it matters: There’s mounting national evidence that students are suffering major setbacks this year, with a surge in the number of failing grades.

3 hours ago - World

European countries extend lockdowns

A medical worker takes a COVID-19 throat swab sample at the Berlin-Brandenburg Airport. Photo by Maja Hitij via Getty

Recent spikes in COVID-19 infections across Europe have led authorities to extend restrictions ahead of the holiday season.

Why it matters: "Relaxing too fast and too much is a risk for a third wave after Christmas," said European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen.