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Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images

The Senate passed the House coronavirus relief bill 90-8 without changes Wednesday, freeing up Congress to focus more energy on passing subsequent legislation that will likely amount to one of the largest emergency spending packages in modern history.

The big picture: The deal, negotiated between Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, includes free coronavirus testing — even for the uninsured; two weeks of paid sick and family leave; increased federal funds for Medicaid and food security programs, like food stamps; and increased unemployment insurance benefits.

  • The bill is considered "phase two" of Congress' coronavirus legislative efforts, and negotiations over a "phase three" deal are already underway.
  • It's still unclear how much it will cost, and the Congressional Budget Office has not yet scored it. But the Joint Committee on Taxation estimates it will cost roughly $100 billion.

Between the lines: Many senators protested the bill, arguing that it doesn't do enough for small businesses and industries hit hardest by the virus.

  • But McConnell bluntly told those senators Tuesday that they should "gag and vote for it anyway" — and to address their grievances in the next package, which the Senate is in the process of drafting.
  • The “no” votes included Sens. Marsha Blackburn (R-Tenn.), Jim Inhofe (R-Okla.), James Lankford (R-Okla.), Mike Lee (R-Utah), Rand Paul (R-Ky.), Ben Sasse (R-Neb.), Tim Scott (R-S.C.) and Ron Johnson (R-Wisc.).

What's next: McConnell said the Senate will stay in session until "phase three" is passed.

  • Senate Republicans are driving the process, and they are working with closely with Treasury and the White House to reach a deal as soon as possible.
  • Talks are still fluid, but the White House is pushing for an additional $1 trillion to be dedicated to combatting the economic effects of the virus.
  • A Treasury fact sheet proposes sending checks to many Americans and devoting $300 billion to helping small businesses.
  • The fact sheet also calls for the creation of a $50 billion “airline industry secured lending facility” that would allow it to make direct loans to “U.S. passenger and cargo air carriers.”
  • The House, which is currently in recess, does not plan to return to Capitol Hill until after the Senate passes a third bill.

Go deeper: White House proposes $1 trillion coronavirus stimulus package

Go deeper

Using apps to prevent deadly police encounters

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Mobile phone apps are evolving in ways that can stop rather than simply document deadly police encounters with people of color — including notifying family and lawyers about potential violations in real time.

Why it matters: As states and cities face pressure to reform excessive force policies, apps that monitor police are becoming more interactive, gathering evidence against rogue officers as well as posting social media videos to shame the agencies.

Dan Primack, author of Pro Rata
14 hours ago - Technology

TikTok gets more time (again)

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

The White House is again giving TikTok's Chinese parent company more to satisfy national security concerns, rather than initiating legal action, a source familiar with the situation tells Axios.

The state of play: China's ByteDance had until Friday to resolve issues raised by the Committee on Foreign Investment in the U.S. (CFIUS), which is chaired by Treasury secretary Steve Mnuchin. This was the company's third deadline, with CFIUS having provided two earlier extensions.

Federal judge orders Trump administration to restore DACA

DACA recipients and their supporters rally outside the U.S. Supreme Court on June 18. Photo: Drew Angerer via Getty

A federal judge on Friday ordered the Trump administration to fully restore the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, giving undocumented immigrants who arrived in the U.S. as children a chance to petition for protection from deportation.

Why it matters: DACA was implemented under former President Obama, but President Trump has sought to undo the program since taking office. Friday’s ruling will require Department of Homeland Security officers to begin accepting applications starting Monday and guarantee that work permits are valid for two years.