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U.S. Capitol police officers testify during a House select committee hearing on the Jan. 6 Capitol riot on July 27. Photo: Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/Pool via Xinhua

A $2.1 billion Capitol security funding bill is heading to President Biden for his signature after the House and Senate passed the legislation on Thursday.

Why it matters: The legislation provides funding for the Capitol Police, the National Guard and other agencies to cover the costs incurred during the Jan. 6 riot.

The big picture: Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.), who chairs the Senate Appropriations Committee, and Sen. Richard Shelby (R-Ala.), the committee's ranking member, announced an agreement on the $2 billion package Tuesday, the same day four police officers testified about their personal experiences at the Capitol on Jan. 6 .

  • The Senate approved the measure by a 98-0 vote on Thursday, and the House later passed it for a second time with a 416-11 vote.
  • Six progressive Democrats and five Republicans voted against the bill in the House.
  • The House passed a $1.9 billion security spending bill in May in response to the Jan. 6 attack, but was stalled by a funding impasse in the Senate.

Between the lines: The package includes $70.7 million in salaries and general expenses for the Capitol Police response to the riot, per a fact sheet released by Leahy's office.

  • $300 million will go to infrastructure upgrades to the Capitol, including installing new cameras around the building and House offices.
  • The National Guard will be reimbursed $521 million for deploying guards to help with security efforts on Jan. 6 and after.
  • The package also includes about $500 million for the Department of Defense to assist Afghan nationals who facilitated U.S. war efforts. The State Department will also receive about $600 million to process special immigrant visas for Afghans who are relocating to the U.S., per the fact sheet.

Go deeper: National Guard cutting costs due to funding impasse in Congress

Go deeper

19 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Democrats plot debt-limit options

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer leave the U.S. Capitol this week. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

Democratic leadership in the House and Senate are working on a short-term funding bill — which needs to pass before Oct. 1 to avoid a government shutdown — that includes a debt-limit increase.

Why it matters: The country will default on its debt in October for the first time in U.S. history if Congress doesn't increase the federal debt limit. Republicans and Democrats have entered a standoff — daring the other side to blink.

Democrats unveil voting rights compromise bill

Photo: Ed Jones/AFP via Getty Images

Senate Democrats on Tuesday introduced a pared-down voting bill — with support from both progressive and centrist wings of the party — aimed at expanding voter access and countering nationwide Republican-led efforts to alter election laws.

Why it matters: The Freedom to Vote Act is the product of negotiations overseen by Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) and was built from a framework put forward by Sen. Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.), whose vote is crucial to Democratic efforts to advance legislation in the chamber.

Ex-intel officials claim antitrust could hurt U.S. in China tech race

Former Defense Secretary Leon Panetta at the 2016 Democratic National Convention. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

Twelve former top U.S. national security officials are urging Congress to hit pause on a package of antitrust bills in order to consider how breaking up tech companies could harm the U.S. in its competition with China, according to a letter obtained by Axios.

The big picture: Former Defense Secretary Leon Panetta and former Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats are among those arguing that imposing severe restrictions solely on U.S. giants will pave the way for a tech landscape dominated by China — echoing a position voiced by the Big Tech companies themselves.