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Sens. Mark Warner and Richard Burr. Photo: Zach Gibson/Getty Images

The Senate Intelligence Committee on Thursday released the third volume of its report on foreign interference in the 2016 election, which covered the U.S. government's response to Russia's hacking of Democratic emails and social media manipulation efforts.

The big picture: The committee found that the government was "not well-postured" to counter Russian interference with policy measures and that the Obama administration was constrained by its reluctance to publicize election meddling for fear of appearing political.

  • "The Committee found that decisions to limit and delay the information flow regarding the 2016 Russian active measures campaign, while understandable, inadvertently constrained the administration's ability to respond," the committee writes in its findings.

Driving the news: The third volume of the report was released one day after President Trump was acquitted by the Senate for attempting to solicit foreign interference in the 2020 election.

  • In the "recommendations" section of its report, the committee states that the president "should take steps to separate himself or herself from political considerations when handling issues related to foreign influence operations."
  • "These steps should include explicitly putting aside politics when addressing the American people on election threats and marshalling all the resources of the U.S. government to effectively confront the threat," the report continues.

Read the full report.

Go deeper:

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The new Washington

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The Axios subject-matter experts brief you on the incoming administration's plans and team.

Rep. Lou Correa tests positive for COVID-19

Lou Correa. Photo: Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

Rep. Lou Correa (D-Calif.) announced on Saturday that he has tested positive for the coronavirus.

Why it matters: Correa is the latest Democratic lawmaker to share his positive test results after last week's deadly Capitol riot. Correa did not shelter in the designated safe zone with his congressional colleagues during the siege, per a spokesperson, instead staying outside to help Capitol Police.

Far-right figure "Baked Alaska" arrested for involvement in Capitol siege

Photo: Shay Horse/NurPhoto via Getty Images

The FBI arrested far-right media figure Tim Gionet, known as "Baked Alaska," on Saturday for his involvement in last week's Capitol riot, according to a statement of facts filed in the U.S. District Court in the District of Columbia.

The state of play: Gionet was arrested in Houston on charges related to disorderly or disruptive conduct on the Capitol grounds or in any of the Capitol buildings with the intent to impede, disrupt, or disturb the orderly conduct of a session, per AP.

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