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Map showing a computer model projection of the "misery index" (heat plus humidity) on July 2, 2018. Credit: http://earth.nullschool.net

July is typically the hottest month of the year, for both the U.S. and the planet as a whole. However, this year it is going to start off particularly hot across the country, as a dangerous heat wave stretches from Arizona to Maine.

Why it matters: The heat and humidity will combine to create life-threatening conditions in many cities, particularly in the Midwest and Northeast, where heat advisories and excessive heat warnings are in effect.

The cause: A sprawling and unusually intense area of high pressure aloft, also known as a "heat dome," will promote sinking air and sunny, storm-free conditions for areas under its influence.

  • At the peak of the heat wave between July 1 and the Fourth of July holiday, more than 50% of the lower 48 states are forecast to see high temperatures exceeding 90 degrees Fahrenheit.

The sweaty details: Some cities, including Kansas City, St. Louis, Chicago, Detroit, New York City, Philadelphia, Washington, and Nashville, could all see temperatures reach or exceed 100 degrees Fahrenheit, which is about 10 to 20 degrees above average for this time of year.

Forecast maximum heat index for July 2, 2018. Credit: NOAA
  • In the Northeast, the hottest day is forecast on Sunday, July 1. Even parts of Canada could see temperatures flirt with the century mark that day.
  • The high humidity will make it feel even hotter, with heat indices above 105 degrees Fahrenheit in some places.

Be smart: The heat will be sufficient to break at least daily record highs, as well as set records for the warmest overnight low temperatures. Denver already tied its all-time high temperature record of 105 degrees Fahrenheit on Thursday.

This extreme weather event will also be more noteworthy for its geographical scope and long duration than for its intensity — some locations will see seven-to-10 days straight of 90-degree or above conditions.

The big picture: Climate scientists have shown in multiple peer reviewed studies that heat waves are already becoming more likely and more intense across the globe as the overall climate warms due to rising amounts of greenhouse gases in the air.

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Updated 4 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Health: The good and bad news about antibody therapies — Fauci: Hotspots have materialized across "the entire country."
  2. World: Belgium imposes lockdown, citing "health emergency" due to influx of cases.
  3. Economy: Conference Board predicts economy won’t fully recover until late 2021.
  4. Education: Surge threatens to shut classrooms down again.
  5. Technology: The pandemic isn't slowing tech.
  6. Travel: CDC replaces COVID-19 cruise ban with less restrictive "conditional sailing order."
  7. Sports: High school football's pandemic struggles.
  8. 🎧Podcast: The vaccine race turns toward nationalism.
Dan Primack, author of Pro Rata
Updated 5 hours ago - Economy & Business

Dunkin' Brands agrees to $11B Inspire Brands sale

Photo: Alexi Rosenfeld/Getty Images

Dunkin' Brands, operator of both Dunkin' Donuts and Baskin-Robbins, agreed on Friday to be taken private for nearly $11.3 billion, including debt, by Inspire Brands, a restaurant platform sponsored by private equity firm Roark Capital.

Why it matters: Buying Dunkin’ will more than double Inspire’s footprint, making it one of the biggest restaurant deals in the past 10 years. This could ultimately set up an IPO for Inspire, which already owns Arby's, Jimmy John's and Buffalo Wild Wings.

Ina Fried, author of Login
6 hours ago - Technology

Federal judge halts Trump administration limit on TikTok

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

A federal judge on Friday issued an injunction preventing the Trump administration from imposing limits on the distribution of TikTok, Bloomberg reports. The injunction request came as part of a suit brought by creators who make a living on the video service.

Why it matters: The administration has been seeking to force a sale of, or block, the Chinese-owned service. It also moved to ban the service from operating in the U.S. as of Nov. 12, a move which was put on hold by Friday's injunction.

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