Photo: Meta View

A new startup has acquired the assets of defunct augmented reality headset maker Meta. Meta View, as the new company is known, has hired some of the old employees but plans to use the wide-field-of-view headset technology for a particular vertical market (which it isn't identifying).

Why it matters: The once-promising technology has a new home, but its vision of a desktop computer on your face has died with the original Meta. Meta, which had developed two generations of its AR headset, abruptly closed its doors earlier this year.

Details:

  • The CEO is Jay Wright, the former Qualcomm executive who led its Vuforia augmented reality effort, later sold to PTC.
  • The new effort is being funded by Israel's Olive Tree Ventures and BNSG Capital.
  • It has somewhere between 11 and 50 employees, though the company isn't being more specific.

What they're saying: Wright tells Axios that the company is focused on a particular industry, with its planned hardware and software tailored to that market's needs. He contrasted that approach to the rest of the industry, which he said is selling the equivalent of "sporks" rather than a needed utensil. "When you are doing something general purpose, you make all these tradeoffs," he said.

What they're not saying: Meta View isn't saying which market they are targeting or how much funding they have.

  • Wright says he is well aware that most of the current VR industry is also shifting toward business as the consumer market has taken off more slowly than anticipated.
  • "I’m not crazy," he said. "I’ve got a plan."

Go deeper

Trump's 2 chilling debate warnings

Photo: Morry Gash/Pool via Getty Images

One of the few groups in America with anything to celebrate after last night's loud, ugly, rowdy presidential "debate" was the violent, far-right Proud Boys, after President Trump pointedly refused to condemn white supremacist groups.

Why it matters: This was a for-the-history-books moment in a debate that was mostly headache-inducing noise. Trump failed to condemn racist groups after four months when millions marched for racial justice in the country's largest wave of activism in half a century.

Ina Fried, author of Login
34 mins ago - Technology

Candidates go online to cut through debate noise

Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

While President Trump and Joe Biden fought to be heard in a rowdy debate Tuesday, both campaigns sought to draw digital battle lines and occupy online turf they could have all to themselves.

The big picture: Trump's impulsive Twitter style made a shambles of the debate format, but online the candidates were able to find niches where they couldn't be interrupted — and could motivate their supporters to donate, organize and turn out to vote.

Ben Geman, author of Generate
1 hour ago - Energy & Environment

Shell plans up to 9,000 job cuts by 2022

A Shell station in Brazil. Photo: Rafael Henrique/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Royal Dutch Shell will shed up to 9,000 jobs as it undergoes a long-term restructuring around climate-friendly energy sources and continues to grapple with the coronavirus pandemic that has battered the oil industry.

Why it matters: The cuts could amount to over 10% of the company's global workforce, which was 83,000 at the end of 2019.