Apr 9, 2019

Scoop: Senators target the ways tech tricks you

Sen. Mark Warner. Photo: Al Drago/Getty Images

Sens. Mark Warner (D-Va.) and Deb Fischer (R-Neb.) will debut a measure Tuesday that cracks down on manipulative design features in major web platforms like Google, Facebook and Amazon meant to capture users’ consent or data.

Why it matters: Lawmakers are trying to put checks on the fundamental design choices that Silicon Valley uses to attract and retain users. Those “dark patterns” targeted by the new legislation can get users to agree to data collection or other practices they would not consent to if they understood that’s what they were doing.

An example of a dark pattern is when LinkedIn prodded users to let it email their contacts with either an invitation to join the users’ network or create an account on the service.

  • Critics contend that the data gathered in part through these practices gives the biggest tech companies a major advantage over their smaller competitors.

Details: The Deceptive Experiences to Online Users Reduction Act would apply to online services with over 100 million monthly active users.

  • The bill would make it illegal for one of the services to “design, modify, or manipulate a user interface with the purpose or substantial effect of obscuring, subverting, or impairing user autonomy, decision-making, or choice to obtain consent or user data,” according to its draft text.
  • It also bans design features aimed at “cultivating compulsive usage” for kids under the age of 13 and dividing consumers out in order to perform experiments on them without their consent.
  • Services would also have to regularly make public details of experiments they conducted “with the purposes of promoting engagement or product conversion.”

Provisions in the bill would be enforced by both the Federal Trade Commission and an outside body, comparable to the self-regulatory organization that polices the securities industry, including at least one director not linked to one of the online services being regulated.

Yes, but: Identifying "dark patterns" is a thorny task. Separating deceptive data-gathering practices from measures on the right side of the line would be complex and must take into account a vast number of variables.

The big picture: The bill is one of several expected to emerge from Warner’s memo, first reported by Axios last year, laying out ways to rein in Big Tech — and the latest idea to take aim directly at core practices of major tech firms.

  • Sen. Ed Markey (D-Mass.) said last week he plans to introduce legislation banning manipulative designs targeting children online, as well as algorithms that can steer them to harmful content.
  • U.K. policymakers just proposed regulations that would include guidelines for how online services could be designed with safety in mind.

Go deeper: Read the bill

Editor's note: This story has been updated with a link to the full text of the legislation.

Go deeper

U.S. coronavirus updates

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins; Map: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios. This graphic includes "probable deaths" that New York City began reporting on April 14.

More than 62,300 U.S. health care workers have tested positive for the novel coronavirus and at least 291 have died from the virus, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported on Tuesday. COVID-19 had infected about 9,300 health professionals when the CDC gave its last update on April 17.

By the numbers: More than 98,900 people have died from COVID-19 and over 1.6 million have tested positive in the U.S. Over 384,900 Americans have recovered and more than 14.9 million tests have been conducted.

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 11:00 p.m. ET: 5,589,626 — Total deaths: 350,453 — Total recoveries — 2,286,956Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 11:00 p.m. ET: 1,680,913 — Total deaths: 98,913 — Total recoveries: 384,902 — Total tested: 14,907,041Map.
  3. Federal response: DOJ investigates meatpacking industry over soaring beef pricesMike Pence's press secretary returns to work.
  4. Congress: House Republicans to sue Nancy Pelosi in effort to block proxy voting.
  5. Business: How the new workplace could leave parents behind.
  6. Tech: Twitter fact-checks Trump's tweets about mail-in voting for first timeGoogle to open offices July 6 for 10% of workers.
  7. Public health: Coronavirus antibodies could give "short-term immunity," CDC says, but more data is neededCDC releases guidance on when you can be around others after contracting the virus.
  8. What should I do? When you can be around others after contracting the coronavirus — Traveling, asthma, dishes, disinfectants and being contagiousMasks, lending books and self-isolatingExercise, laundry, what counts as soap — Pets, moving and personal healthAnswers about the virus from Axios expertsWhat to know about social distancingHow to minimize your risk.
  9. Other resources: CDC on how to avoid the virus, what to do if you get it, the right mask to wear.

Subscribe to Mike Allen's Axios AM to follow our coronavirus coverage each morning from your inbox.

Updated 38 mins ago - Politics & Policy

World coronavirus updates

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins; Map: Axios Visuals

There are no COVID-19 patients in hospital in New Zealand, which reported just 21 active cases after days of zero new infections. A top NZ health official said Tuesday he's "confident we have broken the chain of domestic transmission."

By the numbers: Almost 5.5 million people have tested positive for the novel coronavirus as of Tuesday, and more than 2.2 million have recovered. The U.S. has reported the most cases in the world (over 1.6 million from 14.9 million tests).