Jan 20, 2020

Trump impeachment trial: Schumer vows to "force votes" on witnesses

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer speaks to reporters on Jan. 8 in Washington, D.C. Photo: Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer vowed Sunday evening to "force votes on witnesses and documents" in the impeachment trial against President Trump that starts this week. And he questioned why Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell was "being so secretive about his proposal."

What he's saying: "We Democrats aim to get the truth," Schumer said. "It will be up to four Republicans to side with the Constitution, to side with our democracy, to side with rule of law, and not side, in blind obeisance, to President Trump and his desire to suppress the truth. Because, in my judgment, he probably thinks he's guilty."

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Editor's note: This article has been updated with more details and comments from the news conference.

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Pelosi slams McConnell trial rules as "deliberately designed to hide the truth"

Photo: Mark Wilson/Getty Images

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) claimed in a statement Tuesday that the rules Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) has proposed for President Trump's impeachment trial diverge from the Clinton precedent and show he has "chosen a cover-up" over a fair trial.

Context: McConnell made public an organizing resolution Monday laying out the terms for the trial, which include 24 hours over two days for each side to present their cases. It would block evidence discovered in the House impeachment investigation from being presented without a separate vote, and it would delay a vote on whether to subpoena witnesses and documents until later in the trial.

Go deeperArrowJan 21, 2020

McConnell changes rules for Senate impeachment trial

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell walks back to the Senate through the Capitol Rotunda. Photo: Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc. via Getty Images

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell revised the terms for President Trump's impeachment trial during Tuesday's proceedings, after his office released the organizing resolution on Monday.

What's new: The House record will be admitted as evidence, but each side retains the ability to raise motions regarding what can be added or struck as evidence, a McConnell spokesperson told Axios. House Democratic managers and Trump's defense team will be given up to 24 hours over three days to present their cases, instead of the two days in McConnell's original draft.

Go deeperArrowUpdated Jan 21, 2020

Trump impeachment trial recap, day 1: Senators approve rules of proceeding

Photos: Caroline Brehman/CQ-Roll Call, Inc; Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

The first day of the Senate impeachment trial of President Trump saw a series of procedural clashes over the rules at the heart of the proceeding on Tuesday.

What happened: Senators ultimately approved Senate Majority Leader's Mitch McConnell's proposed roadmap for the trial after a series of votes initiated by Democrats to include more witnesses and evidence failed along party lines.

Go deeperArrowJan 22, 2020