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Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Parents are pressuring their communities for better preparedness, resources and action plans to keep their children safe in schools.

Why it matters: Deadly school shootings in the U.S. have been on the rise, garnering national attention on what schools could be doing better to help students emotionally and physically.

Between the lines: To help prevent violence, most districts are focused on protecting students who are suicidal and helping students deal with conflict.

"It’s really the connection that the students have with the people in the school that really make a difference when you look at prevention."
— John Kelly, school psychologist and past-president of the National Association of School Psychologists.

The big picture: Most of the 250 bills introduced across the U.S. address physical measures like metal detectors or law enforcement officers. Some state and local legislatures are working with school districts on what works for students in their communities, including addressing students' emotional and mental health needs.

What they're doing:

  • Texas has been funneling more money into schools for safety measures. Its Frisco school district purchased bullet proof glass, lockdown technology and mental health teams, the Dallas Morning News reports.
  • Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis issued an executive order in February putting in place several administrative steps targeting school safety, such as requiring a state review of all school district discipline diversion programs, the Tampa Bay Times reports.
  • The Trump administration worked with families affected by the Parkland, Florida school shooting and launched schoolsafety.gov aiming to give schools a "one-stop shop" for K-12 security, mental health resources and school violence prevention and recovery.

The bottom line: Parents ranked school safety the top priority over several academic opportunities like AP testing and tutoring, the Dallas Morning News polled in December.

Go deeper:

Go deeper

Dan Primack, author of Pro Rata
2 hours ago - Economy & Business

The unicorn stampede is coming

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

Airbnb and DoorDash plan to go public in the next few weeks, capping off a very busy year for IPOs.

What's next: You ain't seen nothing yet.

15 hours ago - World

Maximum pressure campaign escalates with Fakhrizadeh killing

Photo: Fars News Agency via AP

The assassination of Mohsen Fakhrizadeh, the architect of Iran’s military nuclear program, is a new height in the maximum pressure campaign led by the Trump administration and the Netanyahu government against Iran.

Why it matters: It exceeds the capture of the Iranian nuclear archives by the Mossad, and the sabotage in the advanced centrifuge facility in Natanz.

Scoop: Biden weighs retired General Lloyd Austin for Pentagon chief

Lloyd Austin testifying before Congress in 2015. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Joe Biden is considering retired four-star General Lloyd Austin as his nominee for defense secretary, adding him to a shortlist that includes Jeh Johnson, Tammy Duckworth and Michele Flournoy, two sources with direct knowledge of the decision-making tell Axios.

Why it matters: A nominee for Pentagon chief was noticeably absent when the president-elect rolled out his national security team Tuesday. Flournoy had been widely seen as the likely pick, but Axios is told other factors — race, experience, Biden's comfort level — have come into play.