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Customers at a Samsung store in Kolkata, India. Photo: Avishek Das/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Samsung said Monday it plans to debut five new devices at its Unpacked event next month.

Why it matters: Samsung remains the main rival to Apple in the high end of the mobile market, but the pandemic may leave fewer people with either the budget or the appetite for a fancy new mobile device.

Between the lines: Roh acknowledges the market has changed, but plays up the value of mobile devices during the pandemic, pointing to technology's role in distance learning, entertainment and fitness at home.

"I consider this new era as the ‘Next Normal’ and technology — especially mobile technology — has a critical role in it. As leaders of the tech industry, we have a special responsibility — and now a true sense of urgency — to help society continue to move forward."
— T.M. Roh

Our thought bubble: Technology is playing a critical part in keeping society moving during the pandemic. But in many developed markets, users' focus right now is on tablets and PCs more than smartphones — a big shift from the last 15 years, when mobile technology has had the most transformative effects.

Yes, but: For billions of people around the world — and a not insignificant number of Americans — the smartphone remains the only computing device they own. Most of them won't be able to afford the high-end devices Samsung is expected to talk about next month.

Go deeper

Why Facebook's cloud gaming won't be coming to your iPhone

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Facebook on Monday launched its free cloud gaming platform on desktop and Google's Android mobile operating system but said it it couldn't offer the service on Apple's iOS because of Apple's "arbitrary" policies on applications that act like app stores.

The big picture: It's the latest example of the complex interrelationships among tech's biggest companies, which cooperate with one another in some areas while competing and fighting in others.

Updated 38 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

  1. Health: Most vulnerable Americans aren't getting enough vaccine information — Fauci says Trump administration's lack of facts on COVID "very likely" cost lives.
  2. Education: Schools face an uphill battle to reopen during the pandemic.
  3. Vaccine: Florida requiring proof of residency to get vaccine — CDC extends interval between vaccine doses for exceptional cases.
  4. World: Hong Kong puts tens of thousands on lockdown as cases surge — Pfizer to supply 40 million vaccine doses to lower-income countries — Brazil begins distributing AstraZeneca vaccine.
  5. Sports: 2021 Tokyo Olympics hang in the balance.
  6. 🎧 Podcast: Carbon Health's CEO on unsticking the vaccine bottleneck.

DOJ: Capitol rioter threatened to "assassinate" Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez

Supporters of former President Trump storm the U.S. Captiol on Jan. 6. Photo: Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

A Texas man who has been charged with storming the U.S. Capitol in the deadly Jan. 6 siege posted death threats against Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.), the Department of Justice said.

The big picture: Garret Miller faces five charges in connection to the riot by supporters of former President Trump, including violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds and making threats. According to court documents, Miller posted violent threats online the day of the siege, including tweeting “Assassinate AOC.”