Octav Ganea / AP

Wired's July cover story reveals Russia has been cyber attacking Ukraine for years, based on six months of reporting by senior writer Andy Greenberg:

  • "[H]ackers are now able to halt the gears of modern society. But, these blackouts weren't just isolated attacks. They were part of a digital blitzkrieg that has pummeled Ukraine over the past three years — a sustained cyber assault that has systematically undermined every sector of the economy: media, finance, transportation, military, politics and, energy.
  • "Global cybersecurity analysts have a theory about the endgame of Ukraine's hacking epidemic: They believe Russia is using the country as a cyberwar testing ground — a laboratory for perfecting new forms of global online combat."
  • "[T]he digital explosives that Russia has repeatedly set off in Ukraine are ones it has planted at least once before in the civil infrastructure of the United States."

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