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Russian President Vladimir Putin in Moscow on April 1. Photo: Alexei Druzhinin\TASS via Getty Images

A Russian court on Friday found Twitter guilty of three counts of violating regulations on restricting unlawful content and fined the company 8.9 million rubles (about $117,000) for not removing posts that encouraged minors to take part in unauthorized protests, according to AP.

Why it matters: The fine comes amid a broad crackdown on the social media company in the country. In March, Russian authorities threatened to ban the platform entirely if the company did not remove some 3,000 posts containing content the government had deemed illegal.

  • Twitter did not immediately comment on Friday's ruling in Russia.

Context: Twitter and other U.S. social media companies are spaces for freedom of expression in Russia and have long provided a forum for political dissent inside the country.

  • Russia's telecommunications regulator, Roskomnadzor, slowed load times to Twitter in March because it claimed the company did not remove tweets that contained illegal drug use or child pornography or "content [that] incites minors to commit suicide."
  • Twitter said in response that it has a zero-tolerance policy regarding child sexual exploitation and illegal activities, like selling or buying drugs.

The big picture: Twitter and other social media platforms have been used to organize large protests in multiple cities across Russia over the detention of opposition leader Alexey Navalny.

  • The Russian government in recent years has limited its internet connection to the rest of the world in order to wrest more control over the country's domestic internet.

Go deeper

Apr 2, 2021 - World

Biden holds first call with Ukraine's Zelensky as Russia tensions escalate

Photo: Sergii Kharchenko/NurPhoto via Getty Images

President Biden spoke with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky on Friday for the first time since taking office, as U.S. and NATO officials warn of a Russian military buildup near eastern Ukraine that could ignite the long-simmering conflict, according to the White House.

Why it matters: It took more than two months for Biden to speak directly with the president of Ukraine, a key frontline partner in eastern Europe that has been pleading for more help from the West in its fight against Russian aggression.

What we know about the victims of the Indianapolis mass shooting

Officials load a body into a vehicle at the site of the mass shooting in Indianapolis. Photo:

Eight people who were killed along with several others who were injured in a Thursday evening shooting at a FedEx facility in Indianapolis have been identified by local law enforcement.

The big picture: The Sikh Coalition said at least four of the eight victims were members of the Indianapolis Sikh community.

Pompeo, wife misused State Dept. resources, federal watchdog finds

Former Secretary of State Mike Pompeo. Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

The State Department's independent watchdog found that former Secretary of State Mike Pompeo violated federal ethics rules when he and his wife asked department employees to perform personal tasks on more than 100 occasions, including picking up their dog and making private dinner reservations.

Why it matters: The report comes as Pompeo pours money into a new political group amid speculation about a possible 2024 presidential run.