An image of the Earth taken from the International Space Station. Photo: NASA

Russia conducted a test of an in-space anti-satellite weapon last week, according to U.S. Space Command statement released Thursday.

Why it matters: The test didn't destroy a satellite, but the Pentagon is pointing to it as evidence of a troubling trend by Russia that has escalated tensions in orbit.

  • The test took place on July 15 when the satellite Cosmos 2543 fired an object not far from another Russian satellite.
  • Before the test, the satellite system was flying near a powerful U.S. spy satellite.
  • "This is further evidence of Russia's continuing efforts to develop and test space-based systems, and consistent with the Kremlin's published military doctrine to employ weapons that hold U.S. and allied space assets at risk," Gen. John Raymond, Space Force Chief of Space Operations said in the statement.

The backdrop: This test comes after another Russian anti-satellite test in April, which involved a different kind of weapon launched from the ground.

The big picture: Countries that are able to operate these anti-satellite systems have refrained from using them against their enemies, but experts stress if that changes in the future, it's not just national assets on the line.

  • The debris created by anti-satellite tests can make wide parts of orbit unusable for all nations, not just those targeted.

Go deeper

State coronavirus testing plans fall short of demand

Data: Department of Health and Human Services via Harvard Global Health Institute; Note: New York City's plan is included in New York state; Cartogram: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

The U.S. plans to test around 600,000 people for the coronavirus every day this month, according to plans that states submitted to the Department of Health and Human Services.

Yes, but: That's likely a drop in testing, compared to July, and it's not enough to meet national demand. By December, states said they plan to ramp up to around a collective 850,000 people tested a day — which also likely will not be enough.

Updated 5 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 9 p.m. ET: 20,755,406 — Total deaths: 752,225— Total recoveries: 12,917,934Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 9 p.m. ET: 5,246,760 — Total deaths: 167,052 — Total recoveries: 1,774,648 — Total tests: 64,831,306Map.
  3. Politics: House Democrats to investigate scientist leading "Operation Warp Speed" vaccine projectMcConnell announces Senate will not hold votes until Sept. 8 unless stimulus deal is reached.
  4. 2020: Biden calls for 3-month national mask mandateBiden and Harris to receive coronavirus briefings 4 times a week.
  5. States: Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp to drop lawsuit over Atlanta's mask mandate.
  6. Business: Why the CARES Act makes 2020 the best year for companies to lose money.
  7. Public health: Fauci's guidance on pre-vaccine coronavirus treatments Cases are falling, but don't get too comfortable.

Trump says he intends to give RNC speech on White House lawn

President Trump speaking to reporters on South Lawn in July. Photo: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images

President Trump told the New York Post on Thursday that he plans to deliver his Republican National Convention speech from the White House lawn, despite bipartisan criticism of the optics and legality of the location.

Why it matters: Previous presidents avoided blurring staged campaign-style events — like party conventions — with official business of governing on the White House premises, per Politico.