A child receiving treatment after an alleged chemical attack in Syria's eastern Ghouta region last month. Photo: Mohammad Al Shami/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

An overnight airstrike on an air base in Syria's Homs province reportedly killed 14, including some Iranians on the ground, per the AP.

Reaction: Pentagon officials denied the U.S. was behind the strike. Russian and Syrian officials said Israeli jets fired the missiles from Lebanese airspace, although Israel’s foreign ministry declined to comment, AP reported.

The backdrop: The action occurred just over 24 hours after an alleged chemical attack that killed dozens outside of Damascus, prompting a robust international response. The incident saw President Trump issue his most direct rhetoric yet against Russian President Vladimir Putin, promising a "big price" to pay.

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New York daily coronavirus cases top 1,000 for first time since June

Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

New York on Friday reported more than 1,000 new coronavirus cases for the first since June.

Why it matters: The New York City metropolitan area was seen as the epicenter of the COVID-19 pandemic throughout the spring. But strict social distancing and mask mandates helped quell the virus' spread, allowing the state to gradually reopen.

Updated 44 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 2 p.m. ET: 32,647,382 — Total deaths: 990,473 — Total recoveries: 22,527,593Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 2 p.m. ET: 7,053,171 — Total deaths: 204,093 — Total recoveries: 2,727,335 — Total tests: 99,488,275Map.
  3. States: U.S. reports over 55,000 new coronavirus cases.
  4. Health: The long-term pain of the mental health pandemicFewer than 10% of Americans have coronavirus antibodies.
  5. Business: Millions start new businesses in time of coronavirus.
  6. Education: Summer college enrollment offers a glimpse of COVID-19's effect.

America on edge as unrest rises

Louisville on Wednesday. Photo: Jon Cherry/Getty Images

Rarely have national security officials, governors, tech CEOs and activists agreed as broadly and fervently as they do about the possibility of historic civil unrest in America.

Why it matters: The ingredients are clear for all to see — epic fights over racism, abortion, elections, the virus and policing, stirred by misinformation and calls to action on social media, at a time of stress over the pandemic.