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Sen. Marco Rubio. Photo: Stefani Reynolds/Getty Images

Acting Senate Intelligence Committee Chair Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) said the committee will still receive in-person briefings on election-security issues, despite a recent directive from the Trump administration barring them, Politico reports.

Driving the news: Director of National Intelligence John Ratcliffe informed congressional committees at the end of August that in-person briefings covering election security will no longer take place and lawmakers will instead receive written intelligence reports. Democrats say that suspending in-person briefings will allow Ratcliffe to skirt accountability and avoid questions.

  • Democratic leaders have demanded that Ratcliffe reinstate the meetings.

The big picture: Election security questions loom as Nov. 3 inches closer. More Americans than ever are expected to mail in ballots as the coronavirus pandemic persists and voters try to avoid possible exposure. There are also worries that foreign powers could intervene in the upcoming election as they did in 2016.

What they're saying: "We are going to continue to schedule these briefings, as we do on a regular basis throughout the year, and we expect them to come in and provide us that information and answer our questions in person," Rubio told Spectrum News.

  • "They can't tell us they're not coming in to talk to us. I don't care what a letter says. They can't do that, and they're not going to do that is what I've been told," Rubio added.

Top House Democrats in a letter to Ratcliffe on Tuesday called for "parity" between the two chambers, alluding to fears that the Democratic-led panel could be shut out of in-person briefings while the Republican-led Senate Intel Committee would still receive them.

  • “If you are unwilling to resume election-related intelligence briefings to Congress, we will have no choice but to consider the full range of tools available to compel compliance,” House Intelligence Committee Chair Adam Schiff, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Rep. Pete Visclosky wrote.

Go deeper

Republicans block inaugural committee from recognizing Biden win

From left, Steny Hoyer, Nancy Pelosi, Roy Blunt, Mitch McConnell, Amy Klobuchar. Photo: Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

Republicans on the Joint Congressional Committee on Inaugural Ceremonies voted against a resolution that would have affirmed the committee was preparing for the inauguration of President-elect Joe Biden, House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer (D-Md.) announced Tuesday.

Why it matters: By voting against the resolution, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.), Sen. Roy Blunt (R-Mo.) and House Republican Leader Kevin McCarthy effectively blocked the committee from publicly recognizing Biden as president-elect.

U.S. economy added 379,000 jobs in February

Data: FRED; Chart: Axios Visuals

The economy added 379,000 jobs in February, while the unemployment rate dropped from 6.3% to 6.2%, the Labor Department said on Friday.

Why it matters: The first Biden-era jobs report shows hiring surged as coronavirus cases eased — though a full recovery remains far off. Economists expected the economy to add roughly 182,000 jobs last month, after adding a paltry 49,000 in January.

This story is breaking news. Please check back for updates.

Dion Rabouin, author of Markets
2 hours ago - Economy & Business

Workers are getting a really bad deal

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

This week's spate of data highlighted the difficulties Americans who have lost their jobs have had bouncing back from the coronavirus pandemic, and just how much those who have managed to keep their jobs have been working.

What's happening: The Labor Department reported Thursday that the productivity of American workers fell by a revised 4.2% annual rate in the fourth quarter, the largest decline in 39 years.