Sign up for our daily briefing

Make your busy days simpler with Axios AM/PM. Catch up on what's new and why it matters in just 5 minutes.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Twin Cities

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa Bay news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa Bay

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Charlotte news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Charlotte

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Pro-life protetsors. Photo: Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post via Getty Images

39 Republican senators and 168 representatives signed an amicus brief on Thursday asking the Supreme Court to revisit and potentially overturn Roe v. Wade, which protects the right for women to seek an abortion.

The big picture: Roe v. Wade has, since the Supreme Court's landmark decision in 1973, served as a barrier against Republicans who have sought to restrict reproductive rights. But with the court's conservative majority and Trump in the Oval Office, right-leaning lawmakers have been testing the limits of the law.

  • A number of states have issued time restrictions on abortions in recent months, usually limiting the procedure to the first trimester of pregnancy.
  • Many cases are being challenged in the courts, with reproductive-rights advocates arguing that curbing the procedure is against Constitutional protections.

Details... The following Republican senators signed the brief, which calls Roe v. Wade's standards unworkable:

  • Sen. John Kennedy (La.)
  • Sen. Marsha Blackburn (Tenn.)
  • Sen. John Barrasso (Wy.)
  • Sen. Roy Blunt (Mo.)
  • Sen. John Boozman (Ark.)
  • Sen. Mike Braun (Ind.)
  • Sen. Richard Burr (N.C.)
  • Sen. Bill Cassidy (La.)
  • Sen. John Cornyn (Tex.)
  • Sen. Tom Cotton (Ark.)
  • Sen. Kevin Cramer (N.D.)
  • Sen. Mike Crapo (Idaho)
  • Sen. Ted Cruz (Tex.)
  • Sen. Steve Daines (Mont.)
  • Sen. Michael Enzi (Wyo.)
  • Sen. Joni Ernst (Iowa)
  • Sen. Deb Fischer (Neb.)
  • Sen. Chuck Grassley (Iowa)
  • Sen. John Hoeven (N.D.)
  • Sen. Cindy Hyde-Smith (Miss.)
  • Sen. James M. Inhofe (Okla.)
  • Sen. Ron Johnson (Wisc.)
  • Sen. James Lankford (Okla.)
  • Sen. Michael S. Lee (Utah)
  • Sen. Jerry Moran (Kan.)
  • Sen. Rand Paul (Ky.)
  • Sen. Rob Portman (Ohio)
  • Sen. James Risch (Idaho)
  • Sen. Pat Roberts (Kan.)
  • Sen. Mitt Romney (Utah)
  • Sen. Mike Rounds (S.D.)
  • Sen. Marco Rubio (Fla.)
  • Sen. Ben Sasse (Neb.)
  • Sen. Tim Scott (S.C.)
  • Sen. Thom Tillis (N.C.)
  • Sen. John Thune (S.D.)
  • Sen. Pat Toomey (Penn.)
  • Sen. Roger F. Wicker (Miss.)
  • Sen. Todd Young (Ind.)

Republican senators who did not sign include: Sens. Susan Collins (Maine), Lisa Murkowksi (Alaska), Dan Sullivan (Alaska), Martha McSally (Ariz.), Shelley Moore Capito (W. Va.), Cory Gardner (Colo.), Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (Ky.), Lamar Alexander (Tenn.), Lindsey Graham (S.C.), Josh Hawley (Mo.), David Perdue (Ga.), Rick Scott (Fla.) and Richard Shelby (Ala.)

  • Among the representatives who signed were Trump loyalists like Reps. Jim Jordan (R-Ohio), Mark Meadows (R-N.C.) and Steve Scalise (R-La.).
  • Democratic Reps. Dan Lipinski (Ill.) and Collin Peterson (Minn.) also signed on.

Go deeper: How many steps it takes to get an abortion in each state

Go deeper

UN poll: Most see climate change as global emergency amid pandemic

Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg (C) fronts a Fridays For Future protest at the Swedish Parliament in Stockholm in September. Photo: Jonathan Nacksrtrand/AFP via Getty Images

64% of people from around the world say climate change is a global emergency, a United Nations poll published Wednesday finds.

Why it matters: It's biggest global survey on climate change ever conducted, with some 1.2 million participants from 50 countries — including the U.S. where 65% of those surveyed view climate change as an emergency.

Collins helps contractor before pro-Susan PAC gets donation

Sen. Susan Collins during her reelection campaign. Photo: Scott Eisen/Getty Images

A PAC backing Sen. Susan Collins in her high-stakes reelection campaign received $150,000 from an entity linked to the wife of a defense contractor whose firm Collins helped land a federal contract, new public records show.

Why it matters: The executive, Martin Kao of Honolulu, leaned heavily on his political connections to boost his business, federal prosecutors say in an ongoing criminal case against him. The donation linked to Kao was veiled until last week.

How cutting GOP corporate cash could backfire

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Companies pulling back on political donations, particularly to members of Congress who voted against certifying President Biden's election win, could inadvertently push Republicans to embrace their party's rightward fringe.

Why it matters: Scores of corporate PACs have paused, scaled back or entirely abandoned their political giving programs. While designed to distance those companies from events that coincided with this month's deadly siege on the U.S. Capitol, research suggests the moves could actually empower the far-right.

You’ve caught up. Now what?

Sign up for Mike Allen’s daily Axios AM and PM newsletters to get smarter, faster on the news that matters.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!