Get the latest market trends in your inbox

Stay on top of the latest market trends and economic insights with the Axios Markets newsletter. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Minneapolis-St. Paul

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa-St. Petersburg news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa-St. Petersburg

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Robert Kaplan, president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, told CBS News' "Face the Nation" Sunday that systemic racism is a constraint on economic growth, and that a more "inclusive" economy with equal opportunities will lead to faster workforce growth and higher productivity.

Why it matters: Protests in major cities around the United States were ignited by the killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis, but they have expanded beyond demonstrations against police brutality to include economic and educational injustices faced by people of color.

What they're saying: "We've made a big point and have been at the Dallas Fed, and across our entire Federal Reserve system, to help improve skills training, to improve educational attainment," Kaplan said.

  • "Because we strongly believe a more inclusive economy will lead to better growth. For years, blacks and Hispanics have had an elevated level of unemployment versus whites. That started to improve dramatically in the last few years. We've now taken a step back as a result of this [coronavirus] crisis."
  • "But a more inclusive economy where everyone has opportunity will mean faster workforce growth, faster productivity growth, and we'll grow faster. And so I think we're right to focus on this and bore in on this. It's in the interest of the U.S. The fastest-growing demographic groups are blacks and Hispanics. If they don't participate equally, then we're going to grow more slowly."

The big picture: So far, more black Americans have lost their jobs than white Americans as a result of the coronavirus-driven recession.

  • The virus has also disproportionately affected black Americans, who face a higher risk of contracting and dying from the coronavirus.
  • Goldman Sachs said that based on loan data, black American business owners have not received the same level relief from the Paycheck Protection Program as other businesses, primarily because they operate in low-income, underbanked communities.

Go deeper: Chronic health conditions, inequality put people of color at higher risk for coronavirus

Go deeper

Poll: U.S. satisfaction hovers near historic lows as economic ratings improve slightly

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Confidence in the U.S. economy remains below its early 2020 levels, though signs of a market bounce-back have improved Americans' views on current economic conditions this past month, according to a Gallup survey out Thursday.

Why it matters: Americans' satisfaction with the state of the union is holding close to historic lows, even as sentiments surrounding the U.S. economy slightly improve based on bright spots in employment numbers and stock market rallies. That, combined with President Trump's job approval rating — which rests below 50% — is "problematic" for his re-election ambitions.

Young people's next big COVID test

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Young, healthy people will be at the back of the line for coronavirus vaccines, and they'll have to maintain their sense of urgency as they wait their turn — otherwise, vaccinations won't be as effective in bringing the pandemic to a close.

The big picture: "It’s great young people are anticipating the vaccine," said Jewel Mullen, associate dean for health equity at the University of Texas. But the prospect of that enthusiasm waning is "a cause for concern," she said.

7 hours ago - World

New Zealand authorities charge 13 parties over deadly volcano eruption

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern at New Zealand's parliament in Wellington. Photo: Mark Tantrum Photography via Getty Images

New Zealand authorities laid safety violation charges Monday against 10 organizations and three individuals over the fatal Whakaari/White Island volcanic disaster last December, per a statement from the agency WorksSafe.

Details: WorksSafe declined to name those charged as they may seek name suppression in court. But Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said government agencies GNS Science, which monitors volcanic activity, and the National Emergency Management Agency were among those charged over the "horrific tragedy" that killed 22 people.