Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Put aside the policy fights for a moment: The debate over whether Trump administration officials deserve to peacefully eat a meal in public tells us a lot about Democratic politics in 2018.

Why it matters: Public shaming and incivility isn't just a nasty expression of outrage. It's targeted at making life difficult, and even serving as a deterrent, for public servants who carry out controversial agendas, writes Brian Beutler, the editor of The Pod Save America website.

Dividing lines:

  • On one side: Centrists and establishment Democrats, driven by respect for norms and a belief that public service deserves respect and civility.
  • On the other: The rising tide of young Democrats and the Resistance, driven by a belief that Republicans aren't interested in civility or compromise.

The big picture: The pro-civility crowd is dominating the airwaves and establishment media. The verdict is less obvious on social media.

What they're saying:

  • Maxine Waters: “If you see anybody from that cabinet in a restaurant, in department store, at a gasoline station, you get out and you create a crowd … tell them they’re not welcome anymore, anywhere!”
  • Nancy Pelosi: Called Waters' response "predictable but unacceptable."
  • Cory Booker: “We’ve got to get to a point in our country where we can talk to each other... some of those tactics that people are advocating for, to me, don’t reflect that spirit.”
  • Arne Duncan: "No matter how much we dislike or disagree with someone, we should not deny them the chance to have a meal."
  • David Axelrod: "Rousting Cabinet members from restaurants is an empty and, ultimately, counter-productive gesture that won’t change a thing."

P.S. Speaking of incivility: President Trump tweeted today that "Waters, an extraordinarily low IQ person... has just called for harm to supporters, of which there are many, of the Make America Great Again movement. Be careful what you wish for Max!"

Go deeper:

Go deeper

Biden: The next president should decide on Ginsburg’s replacement

Joe Biden. Photo: Drew Angerer / Getty Images

Joe Biden is calling for the winner of November's presidential election to select Ruth Bader Ginsburg's replacement on the Supreme Court.

What he's saying: "[L]et me be clear: The voters should pick the president and the president should pick the justice for the Senate to consider," Biden said. "This was the position the Republican Senate took in 2016 when there were almost 10 months to go before the election. That's the position the United States Senate must take today, and the election's only 46 days off.

Trump, McConnell to move fast to replace Ginsburg

Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

President Trump will move within days to nominate his third Supreme Court justice in just three-plus short years — and shape the court for literally decades to come, top Republican sources tell Axios.

Driving the news: Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and Senate Republicans are ready to move to confirm Trump's nominee before Election Day, just 46 days away, setting up one of the most consequential periods of our lifetimes, the sources say.

Updated 8 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 10 p.m. ET: 30,393,591 — Total deaths: 950,344— Total recoveries: 20,679,272Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 10 p.m. ET: 6,722,699 — Total deaths: 198,484 — Total recoveries: 2,556,465 — Total tests: 92,163,649Map.
  3. Politics: In reversal, CDC again recommends coronavirus testing for asymptomatic people.
  4. Health: Massive USPS face mask operation called off The risks of moving too fast on a vaccine.
  5. Business: Unemployment drop-off reverses course 1 million mortgage-holders fall through safety netHow the pandemic has deepened Boeing's 737 MAX crunch.
  6. Education: At least 42% of school employees are vulnerable.