Get the latest market trends in your inbox

Stay on top of the latest market trends and economic insights with the Axios Markets newsletter. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Minneapolis-St. Paul

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa-St. Petersburg news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa-St. Petersburg

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Photo: Al Drago / Pool / Getty Images

Republicans may have won the government shutdown battle, but there is still no winning strategy for the party on immigration.

The bottom line: No one knows what the White House wants on immigration. So while Democrats may be taking the short-term sting from an angry base, the bigger fight comes in three weeks, when Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has committed to take some action on protection for illegal immigrants who came to the U.S. as children, called Dreamers.

What they're saying:

  • Brian McGuire, former chief of staff to McConnell: “I think if there’s one lesson here it’s that the whole idea of filibustering a government funding bill and hoping to get away with it by saying the President’s name a lot was a fairly flawed political strategy.”
  • Jim Manley, a former aide to Harry Reid: "Republicans won vote but the immigration issue isn’t going away anytime soon. Unless they act these DACA recipients are going to start getting deported in a month or so."
  • A Democratic strategist: ""If anyone thinks voters will care about a two day shutdown during midterms in 200 days, they're missing the dynamic here. What voters saw is a Washington controlled by Republicans be utterly dysfunctional." 
  • A former House and Senate leadership aide: "Obviously Republicans won the short term," but going forward, "Republicans in the Senate may be faced with an immigration bill open for amendment, which risks splitting them."

Go deeper: I explained last night why this is such a tough issue for the GOP, and they could easily splinter over what to do.

Go deeper

1 hour ago - Health

Standardized testing becomes another pandemic victim

Photo: Edmund D. Fountain for The Washington Post via Getty

National standardized reading and math tests have been pushed from next year to 2022, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) announced Wednesday.

Why it matters: There’s mounting national evidence that students are suffering major setbacks this year, with a surge in the number of failing grades.

2 hours ago - World

European countries extend lockdowns

A medical worker takes a COVID-19 throat swab sample at the Berlin-Brandenburg Airport. Photo by Maja Hitij via Getty

Recent spikes in COVID-19 infections across Europe have led authorities to extend restrictions ahead of the holiday season.

Why it matters: "Relaxing too fast and too much is a risk for a third wave after Christmas," said European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen.

2 hours ago - Health

Africa CDC: Vaccines likely won't be available until Q2 of 2021

Africa CDC director Dr. John Nkengasong. Photo: Mohammed Abdu Abdulbaqi/Anadolu Agency via Getty

Africa may have to wait until the second quarter of 2021 to roll out vaccines, Africa CDC director John Nkengasong said Thursday, according to the Associated Press.

Why it matters: “I have seen how Africa is neglected when drugs are available,” Nkengasong said.