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Sen. Susan Collins. Photo: Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

Seven Republicans joined Democrats and Independents in finding Donald Trump "guilty" of inciting the Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection, but the Senate failed to reach the two-thirds majority necessary to convict the former president.

The Republicans who voted to convict included: Sens. Richard Burr (N.C.), Bill Cassidy (La.), Susan Collins (Maine), Lisa Murkowski (Alaska), Mitt Romney (Utah), Ben Sasse (Neb.) and Pat Toomey (Pa.).

What they're saying:

  • Murkowski: "If months of lies, organizing a rally of supporters in an effort to thwart the work of Congress, encouraging a crowd to march on the Capitol, and then taking no meaningful action to stop the violence once it began is not worthy of impeachment, conviction, and disqualification from holding office in the United States, I cannot imagine what is."
  • Burr: "By what he did and by what he did not do, President Trump violated his oath of office to preserve, protect, and defend the Constitution of the United States. My hope is that with today’s vote America can begin to move forward and focus on the critical issues facing our country today."
  • Cassidy: "Our Constitution and country is more important than any one person. I voted to convict President Trump because he is guilty."
  • Collins: "My vote in this trial stems from my own oath and duty to defend the Constitution of the United States. The abuse and the betrayal of his oath by President Trump meet the constitutional standard of ‘high crimes and misdemeanors,’ and for those reasons I voted to convict Donald J. Trump."
  • Romney: “President Trump violated his oath of office by failing to protect the Capitol, the Vice President and others in the Capitol. Each and every one of these conclusions compels me to support conviction." 
  • Sasse released a statement before the vote: "In my first speech here in the Senate in November 2015, I promised to speak out when a president – even of my own party – exceeds his or her powers. I cannot go back on my word, and Congress cannot lower our standards on such a grave matter, simply because it is politically convenient. I must vote to convict."
  • Toomey: "I was one of the 74 million Americans who voted for President Trump, in part because of the many accomplishments of his administration. Unfortunately, his behavior after the election betrayed the confidence millions of us placed in him. His betrayal of the Constitution and his oath of office required conviction."

Go deeper: The Senate acquits Trump

Editor's note: This article has been updated with comment from Murkowski.

Go deeper

State GOPs move to punish Republicans who voted to convict Trump

Combination images of Republican Sens. Bill Cassidy and Richard Burr. Photo: Stefani Reynolds/Getty Images/Nicholas Kamm / AFP via Getty Images

Some state GOPs have swiftly rebuked Republican senators who voted to find former President Trump guilty of inciting the Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection.

Driving the news: After the Senate failed to reach the two-thirds majority necessary to convict Trump, the Republican Party of Louisiana announced Saturday evening that its executive committee had voted "unanimously" to censure Sen. Bill Cassidy (R-La.) for voting to convict Trump.

Updated Feb 13, 2021 - Politics & Policy

The Senate acquits Trump

Photo by congress.gov via Getty Images

The Senate failed to reach the two-thirds majority necessary to convict former President Trump on charges of high crimes and misdemeanors, with a final vote of 57-43 cementing his acquittal.

Why it matters: Seven Senate Republicans voted ‘guilty,’ the most bipartisan margin in favor of conviction in history.

Schumer: 43 Republicans chose Trump over country

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) on Saturday accused Republicans who voted to acquit Donald Trump during his second impeachment trial of choosing Trump over country and failing to "summon the courage or the morality to condemn" the former president's actions leading to the deadly Jan. 6 Capitol siege.

Driving the news: Seven Senate Republicans joined all their Democratic and Independent colleagues in the final 57-43 vote, but they failed to reach the two-thirds majority necessary to convict Trump on charges of high crimes and misdemeanors.