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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell. Photo: The Washington Post/Getty Images

The Senate Leadership Fund, a super PAC associated with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, raised more than twice as much this September as it did two years ago, according to an FEC filing that will go live Tuesday night.

By the numbers: The SLF raised $92 million in September, spent $105 million, and ended the month with $113 million cash on hand, as Republicans work to maintain their majority on Nov. 3.

  • That's compared to $37 million the PAC raised in September 2018.

Why it matters: In competitive races, Democratic Senate candidates trounced their Republican opponents in the money race last quarter, with candidates like Jamie Harrison in South Carolina collecting almost $30 million more than Sen. Lindsey Graham.

  • The cash infusion from the SLF, which can raise unlimited contributions, will help Republicans stay competitive and on the air in the final weeks of the campaign.
  • Both parties prefer "hard" dollars from individual campaign committees because they receive better ad rates from local TV stations.
  • "Soft" money from super PACs generally has to pay a higher rate in the campaign's closing weeks.

Go deeper

Updated Nov 11, 2020 - Politics & Policy

The latest: Biden's Georgia win

Expand chart
Data: AP; Note: AP has called Arizona for Biden, but ballots are still being counted and not all organizations have called it yet. Chart: Naema Ahmed, Andrew Witherspoon, Danielle Alberti/Axios

President-elect Joe Biden's projected Georgia win will give him 306 electoral votes over President Trump — virtually matching Trump's margin over Hillary Clinton in 2016.

The latest: Trump has not yet conceded after Biden surpassed the 270 electoral vote threshold needed to capture the presidency. Instead, his legal team, led by Rudy Giuliani, has been spinning baseless conspiracy theories and throwing out evidence-free accusations of fraud.

Dan Primack, author of Pro Rata
8 hours ago - Technology

TikTok gets more time (again)

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

The White House is again giving TikTok's Chinese parent company more to satisfy national security concerns, rather than initiating legal action, a source familiar with the situation tells Axios.

The state of play: China's ByteDance had until Friday to resolve issues raised by the Committee on Foreign Investment in the U.S. (CFIUS), which is chaired by Treasury secretary Steve Mnuchin. This was the company's third deadline, with CFIUS having provided two earlier extensions.

Federal judge orders Trump administration to restore DACA

DACA recipients and their supporters rally outside the U.S. Supreme Court on June 18. Photo: Drew Angerer via Getty

A federal judge on Friday ordered the Trump administration to fully restore the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, giving undocumented immigrants who arrived in the U.S. as children a chance to petition for protection from deportation.

Why it matters: DACA was implemented under former President Obama, but President Trump has sought to undo the program since taking office. Friday’s ruling will require Department of Homeland Security officers to begin accepting applications starting Monday and guarantee that work permits are valid for two years.

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