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Contractors in Phoenix in May 2021 recounting ballots as part of a 2020 general election audit requested by the Arizona State Senate. Photo: Courtney Pedroza for the Washington Post

Republican-held state legislatures have passed bills that give lawmakers more power over the vote by stripping secretaries of state of their power, asserting control over election boards and creating easier methods to overturn election results, according to the New York Times.

Why it matters: The bills, triggered by baseless claims of widespread fraud in the 2020 election, threaten to politicize traditionally non-partisan election functions by giving Republicans more control over election systems.

By the numbers: Republican state lawmakers have introduced at least 216 bills in 41 states to give legislatures more power over election systems, according to the States United Democracy Center, a bipartisan organization created to protect democratic norms.

  • 24 of the bills have been enacted into law across 14 states.

What they're saying: “Had these bills been in place in 2020, they would have significantly added to the turmoil that surrounded the election, and they would have raised the alarming prospect that the outcome of the presidential election could have been decided contrary to how the people voted," States United warned in April.

The big picture: The effort also comes as legislatures have introduced and adopted multiple restrictive voting bills, including in battleground states like Georgia, Pennsylvania, North Carolina, Michigan, Arizona and Wisconsin.

Go deeper: Florida's new voting law has elections supervisors stumped

Go deeper

Florida's new voting law has elections supervisors stumped

Illustration: Brendan Lynch/Axios

State Republicans' stab at election reform has confused the hell out of the 67 county elections supervisors from around Florida.

What's new: The supervisors vented at a summer conference Wednesday with Florida Division of Elections director Maria Matthews at Tampa's Water Street Marriott.

Microsoft mystery: Whether it's covered by new antitrust proposals

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Microsoft wasn't the target of House lawmakers' Big Tech antitrust investigation, but the company may still find itself ensnared by the resulting legislation.

Why it matters: Whether Microsoft, or other large platforms, would be subject to the bipartisan House bills provides an early look at the thorny questions the conditions of the legislation will pose for antitrust enforcers.

Updated 2 hours ago - Health

CDC: Vaccinated people in COVID hotspots should resume wearing masks

CDC director Rochelle Walensky and top infectious disease expert Anthony Fauci at a Senate HELP committee hearing. Photo: J. Scott Applewhite-Pool/Getty Images

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued updated guidance on Tuesday recommending that vaccinated people wear masks in indoor, public settings if they are in parts of the U.S. with substantial to high transmission, among other circumstances.

Why it matters: The guidance, a reversal from recommendations made two months ago, comes as the Delta variant continues to drive up case rates across the country. Millions of people in the U.S. — either by choice or who are ineligible — remain unvaccinated and at risk of serious infection.