Evan Vucci / AP

A Republican Senator told the New York Times on Tuesday that President Trump gave the impression that he "did not have a grasp of some basic elements of the Senate plan" and that he was "especially confused" by the idea of opponents calling the bill "a massive tax break for the wealthy." More aides described Trump as uninterested in the particulars of health care.

"There would be times when he would describe what was clearly Medicare...but say Medicaid, and when we pointed that out, he would say, 'That's what I said, Medicare and Medicaid."
  • When asked if Trump had an understanding of the important aspects of the House and Senate health care bills, a close aide laughed and replied, "not to my knowledge."
  • "The president understands winning," a different official said.
  • Aides don't point out Trump's misunderstandings, not wanting to make him feel or look "dumb."
  • On Trump's campaign promises about repealing and replacing Obamacare, a former campaign aide said, "It wasn't really a policy oriented campaign—policy wasn't on our radar. The sense was, say what wins and figure out the details later."
  • Just as his intelligence briefings have been cut short compared to those of Obama, an official told the Daily Beast, "It is fair to say the president takes [a] similar approach to health care... [It's] 'less is more.'"

Go deeper

Mike Allen, author of AM
51 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Trump-Biden venom on display during final debate

Photos: Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images; Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

Joe Biden twice referred to President Trump as "this guy," and Trump called the former vice president's family "like a vacuum cleaner" for foreign money.

Why it matters: The personal venom — during Thursday's final presidential debate, in Nashville — was a reminder that even during a more normal debate, nothing this year is normal.

Dave Lawler, author of World
2 hours ago - World

Special report: Trump's hopes of nuclear deal with Putin come down to the wire

Illustration: Lazaro Gamio/Axios

A surprise offer from Vladimir Putin has the U.S. and Russia once again circling a potential pre-election nuclear deal.

The big picture: The last treaty constraining the U.S. and Russia, New START, is due to expire on Feb. 5, 2021, two weeks after the next U.S. presidential inauguration. For the first time since the height of the Cold War, the nuclear guardrails could come off.

The cliffhanger could be ... Georgia

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

It hasn't backed a Democrat for president since 1992, but Georgia's changing demographics may prove pivotal this year — not only to Trump v. Biden, but also to whether Democrats take control of the Senate.

Why it matters: If the fate of the Senate did hinge on Georgia, it might be January before we know the outcome. Meanwhile, voters' understanding of this power in the final days of the election could juice turnout enough to impact presidential results.