Alex Stamos. Photo: Sportsfile/Corbis via Getty Images

Alex Stamos, Facebook's chief information security officer, is reportedly leaving the company after clashing with colleagues on how to handle disclosure of the spread of disinformation on the social network, according to the New York Times.

Why it matters: Stamos had posted and then deleted several tweets over the weekend discussing the Cambridge Analytica matter, taking issue with the notion that the incidents represented a "breach" in the traditional sense of the term and noting that apps now don't have as much access to customer data as they did several years ago. He would be the first executive to leave since the latest scandal broke.

Go deeper: Stamos had already been planning to leave, according to the Times, which said he originally was going to exit after many of his duties were reassigned in December, but was persuaded to stay on through August. Stamos confirmed in a tweet Monday that his role had changed at the company.

Facebook issued a statement following Stamos' tweet and declined to say whether he was staying indefinitely:

Alex Stamos continues to be the Chief Security Officer (CSO) at Facebook. He has held this position for nearly three years and leads our security efforts especially around emerging security risks. He is a valued member of the team and we are grateful for all he does each and every day.”
— Facebook spokesperson

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Zeta, now a Category 2 Hurricane, makes landfall on Louisiana coast

The probable path of Zeta, per the National Hurricane Center. Photo: NHC/NOAA

Zeta, classified as a "significant" Category 2 hurricane, made landfall along the southeastern coast of Louisiana on Wednesday evening, according to the National Hurricane Center.

The state of play: Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards (D) requested a pre-landfall Emergency Declaration in a letter to President Trump on Tuesday. The hurricane is producing 110-mph maximum sustained winds and stronger gusts. The core of Zeta — including its destructive eyewall — moved ashore near Cocodrie.

Supreme Court won't expedite Pennsylvania GOP's request to block mail-in ballot extension

Amy Coney Barrett being sworn in by Chief Justice John Roberts. Photo: Fred Schilling/Collection of the Supreme Court of the United States via Getty Images

The Supreme Court voted 5-3 on Wednesday to deny a bid from Pennsylvania Republicans to expedite their request to shorten the deadline for receiving mail-in ballots. Newly-confirmed Justice Amy Coney Barrett did not participate in the decision.

Why it matters: A lower court ruling allowing ballots to be counted until 5 p.m. on Nov. 6, as long as they are postmarked by Election Day, will remain in place for now.

31 mins ago - World

Europe faces "stronger and deadlier" coronavirus wave

Paris under curfew. Photo: Kiran Ridley/Getty Images

The coronavirus is still winning: Now even Germany is entering another national lockdown, joined by France.

Why it matters: France has been "overpowered by a second wave,” President Emmanuel Macron said in a nationally televised address today. Macron said the "new wave will be stronger and deadlier" than the first.