Jul 27, 2019

Rep. Martha Roby won't seek re-election, as GOP faces dwindling number of women in the House

Rep. Martha Roby at a 2016 news conference. Photo: Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call

Rep. Martha Roby (R-Ala.) announced her impending retirement on Friday, potentially leaving Republicans with as few as 11 women in the House after 2020.

Where it stands: Rep. Susan Brooks (R-Ind.) announced her departure from the House in June, and Rep. Liz Cheney (R-Wyo.) is mulling a Senate run, per the Post. The current number of female GOP representatives is the lowest it's been since 1993, according to the Brookings Institution.

  • The 8 female GOP senators currently in office are a record-high for Republicans.
  • Democrats are also at all-time highs in Congress, with 17 female senators and 89 representatives.
“Chairman [Tom] Emmer is committed to making the House Republican caucus more diverse. ... We’ve already met with over 200 women considering running for Congress and will continue doing so. We look forward to having many more women as part of our new Republican Majority after the 2020 elections.”
— National Republican Congressional Committee spokesman Chris Pack, in a statement to the Post

Go deeper: Republicans struggle to elect and retain female members of Congress

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Will Hurd, the only black GOP representative, announces retirement

Hurd listens to testimony about 'deepfakes' on June 13, 2019. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Rep. Will Hurd (R-Tex.) announced on Thursday that he will not seek reelection in his swing district.

Why it matters: Hurd is the only black Republican in the House, and the third Texas Republican to retire this week. He has been known to occasionally criticize President Trump, most recently over the president's racist tweets against 4 Democratic congresswomen of color, per the Washington Post.

Go deeperArrowAug 2, 2019

Rep. Kenny Marchant becomes 4th Texas Republican to announce retirement

Kenny Marchant during a House Ways and Means Committee meeting. Photo: Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call

Rep. Kenny Marchant (R-Texas) announced Monday he will not seek re-election in 2020, becoming the fourth Texas Republican House member to announce retirement in recent weeks, the New York Times first reported.

Why it matters: Texas, which holds 38 electoral college votes, is increasingly becoming more competitive for Democrats in both presidential and congressional elections. Marchant won re-election in Texas' 24th district in November by just 3 points and is now the 12th House Republican retiring at the end of their term. Only 3 House Democrats have announced they aren't running in 2020.

Go deeperArrowAug 5, 2019

Democrats sound alarm on "massive" GOP Senate advantage in 2020

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer talking about new legislation on Capitol Hill. Photo: Mark Wilson/Getty Images

In 2016, every single Senate race went to the candidate of the same party that those states voted for in the presidential election, according to a new analysis by the Democratic group One Country Project, provided exclusively to Axios.

Why it matters: That's never happened before, since at least 1984. And the data shows that's not great news for Democrats heading into the 2020 elections.

Go deeperArrowJul 29, 2019