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Expand chart
Data: Brookings; Chart: Axios Visuals

While the number of women serving in Congress is increasing, there's been a drop in the number of female GOP legislators in recent years while Democrats are seeing greater participation.

Driving the news: Rep. Susan Brooks (R-Ind.) announced her retirement from the House on Friday. She and Rep. Jackie Walorski are the first Republican women to represent Indiana in Congress since 1959.

  • Brooks worked heavily to recruit GOP women to run for office, and her resignation worries Republican legislators about 2020 efforts.
  • Her resignation could send a stark message at a time when the Republican party is trying to recruit more women to run for federal and local offices.

The big picture: Democrats took back control of the House in the 2018 midterms, and credit is owed to the women who ran for office.

  • These female legislators, both freshmen and senior, have been bringing topics such as sexual harassment, paid maternity leave and equal pay to the forefront of Congressional debates.
  • Republicans could be alienating more modern voters because of the lack of gender diversity among candidates, and recent attacks on abortion rights.

By the numbers: There's been a steady increase in the number of female GOP senators. The 8 currently in office is an all-time high, per Brookings Institution.

  • Currently, there's 13 GOP representatives. That's the lowest it's been since 1993, when there were 12 Republican women in the House, according to Brookings.

Go deeper

Dave Lawler, author of World
4 mins ago - World

What has and hasn't changed as Biden takes over U.S. foreign policy

Photo Illustration: Brendan Lynch/Axios. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

President Biden swiftly recommitted the U.S. to the Paris climate pact and the World Health Organization, but America's broader foreign policy is in a state of flux between the Trump and Biden eras.

Driving the news: One of the most striking moves from the Biden administration thus far was a show of continuity — concurring with the Trump administration's last-minute determination that China had committed "genocide" against Uyghur Muslims.

Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Health: New coronavirus cases down, but more bad news ahead — Fighting COVID-19's effects on gender equality.
  2. Politics: Biden unveils "wartime" COVID strategyBiden's COVID-19 bubble.
  3. Vaccine: NYC postpones vaccine appointments following shipment delays — Private companies step in to fill vaccine logistics vacuum.
  4. World: Biden will order U.S. to rejoin World Health OrganizationBiden to bring U.S. into global COVAX initiative for equitable vaccine access.
Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Congress grants waiver for retired Gen. Lloyd Austin to lead Pentagon

Defense Secretary nominee Lloyd Austin. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Both chambers of Congress on Thursday voted to grant retired Gen. Lloyd Austin a waiver to lead the Pentagon, clearing the path to confirmation for President Biden's nominee for defense secretary.

Why it matters: Austin's nomination received pushback from some lawmakers, including Democrats, who cited a law that requires officers be out of the military for at least seven years before taking the job — a statute intended to reinforce the tradition of civilian control of the Pentagon.