Sign up for our daily briefing

Make your busy days simpler with Axios AM/PM. Catch up on what's new and why it matters in just 5 minutes.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Twin Cities

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa Bay news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa Bay

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Charlotte news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Charlotte

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

A growing number of tech companies say workers need not ever come back to the office if they don't want to. The move comes as pandemic-related closures have already kept many tech workers out of the office for months.

Why it matters: Technology's spread into every corner of the broader economy keeps boosting demand for workers with tech skills. That pushes employers to accommodate tech talent wherever they find it.

Driving the news: Dropbox said Tuesday it will become a "virtual-first" company that allows workers to telecommute. The company plans to open new drop-in offices called "Dropbox Studios" once it can do so safely.

  • Microsoft is letting more employees work from home permanently, as The Verge reported last week.
  • Twitter and Square, both led by Jack Dorsey, have said employees can work from home permanently, while Facebook said employees who want to permanently telecommute can request to do so.

Between the lines: Tech companies once lured workers with the fanciest offices and best perks. Now, companies increasingly feel they need a work-from-home option to stay competitive.

  • The move also allows workers to live anywhere and enables companies to recruit from throughout the country and world, rather than be tied to places where they have physical offices.

Yes, but: Workers who move from pricey areas like the Bay Area or New York may see their salaries cut to reflect their more affordable living circumstances.

The big picture: Flexible remote work policies may be helping companies retain employees, too, according to data from recruiting technology firm TopFunnel shared with Axios' Ashley Gold.

  • According to TopFunnel's data, Pinterest, Square and Twitter employees all became less likely to reply to recruiters after work-from-home-friendly policies were announced.
  • Facebook's early embrace of remote work has also resulted in its employees being less likely to reply to recruiters now.

Microsoft, which recently announced a hybrid permanent work from home policy, was an outlier: its employees have been replying to outside recruiters at a higher rate than before.

  • My thought bubble: That could be a sign that Microsoft's workers, concentrated far from Silicon Valley in Seattle, are seeing additional opportunities in a work-from-home world that they can pursue without having to move.

Go deeper

The fractured tech lobby's uphill battles

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

Silicon Valley's leading lobby, the Internet Association, is struggling to manage the competing interests of the companies it represents just as the industry faces a tide of bipartisan anger.

Why it matters: Tech will fight policy battles around antitrust, content moderation and privacy without a unified industry voice.

Jan 14, 2021 - Health

SoCal on the brink

A COVID-19 ICU at Martin Luther King Jr. Community Hospital in the Willowbrook neighborhood of Los Angeles. Photo: Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images

Southern California's COVID outbreak is in a terrible place, and hospitals haven't even been hit with a wave of potential infections from Christmas and New Year's.

The big picture: Hospitalizations have stabilized, but public health officials say that's just from infections linked to Thanksgiving, the L.A. Times reports.

Ina Fried, author of Login
Jan 13, 2021 - Technology

Dropbox to cut workforce by 11%

Photo: Rafael Henrique/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Cloud storage company Dropbox said Wednesday it was cutting 315 jobs, or about 11% of its workforce.

Why it matters: While the tech industry has fared pretty well through the pandemic, those companies that cater to small and midsize businesses have seen their businesses take a hit as their customers are suffering.