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Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

Six months into pandemic-induced telework, employees' priorities are changing. Company culture seems to matter as much — if not more — to workers as getting promoted, says Amy Lavoie, who leads people science at Glint, a human resources platform owned by LinkedIn.

Why it matters: That's a seismic shift in the way Americans think about work — and it underscores the need for CEOs to pay close attention to culture during the pandemic and beyond.

What's happening: 37% of U.S. workers feel less connected to their teammates than they did before the pandemic — and 31% feel less connected to their managers — according to an ongoing survey of employee sentiment, conducted by Glint and provided to Axios.

  • Nearly 1 in 5 workers say their firms aren't doing enough to make employees feel connected to one another.
  • And those who say their companies aren't doing enough are twice as likely to say they feel burned out.

Fostering a good work culture is especially important at firms that have undergone rounds of layoffs, per the report.

  • 56% of employees said they felt less happy after seeing colleagues get furloughed or laid off, and 47% said those events detracted from their sense of belonging at work.

The bottom line: As the pandemic drags on, companies should be watching out for high rates of burnout, Lavoie says. "The pandemic could result in large populations of disengaged employees."

Go deeper

Erica Pandey, author of @Work
Nov 3, 2020 - Economy & Business

Why Reddit's remote work policy is different

Photo illustration: Axios Visuals. Photo: Reddit

Reddit isn't the first big tech company to embrace telework after the pandemic. But the platform stands out from its peers because it says it'll pay workers the same salary — no matter where they live.

Why it matters: The catch in the remote work policies at Facebook, Microsoft and other tech companies has been that although employees can choose to work remotely forever and from anywhere, their pay might be cut if they move out of expensive cities to cheaper ones. Reddit is doing away with that snag.

Wall Street wonders how bad it has to get

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Wall Street is working out how bad the economy will have to get for Congress to feel motivated to move on economic support.

Why it matters: A pre-Thanksgiving data dump showed more evidence of a floundering economic recovery. But the slow drip of crumbling economic data may not be enough to push Washington past a gridlock to halt the economic backslide.

2 hours ago - Health

Moderna to file for FDA emergency use authorization for COVID-19 vaccine

Photo illustration by STR/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Moderna announced that it plans to file with the FDA Monday for an emergency use authorization for its coronavirus vaccine, which the company said has an efficacy rate of 94.1%.

Why it matters: Moderna will become the second company to file for a vaccine EUA after Pfizer did the same earlier this month, potentially paving the way for the U.S. to have two COVID-19 vaccines in distribution by the end of the year. The company said its vaccine has a 100% efficacy rate against severe COVID cases.