Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

Six months into pandemic-induced telework, employees' priorities are changing. Company culture seems to matter as much — if not more — to workers as getting promoted, says Amy Lavoie, who leads people science at Glint, a human resources platform owned by LinkedIn.

Why it matters: That's a seismic shift in the way Americans think about work — and it underscores the need for CEOs to pay close attention to culture during the pandemic and beyond.

What's happening: 37% of U.S. workers feel less connected to their teammates than they did before the pandemic — and 31% feel less connected to their managers — according to an ongoing survey of employee sentiment, conducted by Glint and provided to Axios.

  • Nearly 1 in 5 workers say their firms aren't doing enough to make employees feel connected to one another.
  • And those who say their companies aren't doing enough are twice as likely to say they feel burned out.

Fostering a good work culture is especially important at firms that have undergone rounds of layoffs, per the report.

  • 56% of employees said they felt less happy after seeing colleagues get furloughed or laid off, and 47% said those events detracted from their sense of belonging at work.

The bottom line: As the pandemic drags on, companies should be watching out for high rates of burnout, Lavoie says. "The pandemic could result in large populations of disengaged employees."

Go deeper

Erica Pandey, author of @Work
Sep 22, 2020 - Economy & Business

Remote work won't kill your office

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

We can officially declare the 9-to-5, five-days-a-week, in-office way of working dead. But offices themselves aren't dead. And neither are cities.

The big picture: Since the onset of pandemic-induced telework, companies have oscillated between can't-wait-to-go-back and work-from-home-forever. Now, it's becoming increasingly clear that the future of work will land somewhere in the middle — a remote/in-person hybrid.

Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 10 p.m. EST: 32,135,220 — Total deaths: 981,660 — Total recoveries: 22,149,441Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 10 p.m EST: 6,975,980 — Total deaths: 202,738 — Total recoveries: 2,710,183 — Total tests: 98,481,026Map.
  3. Politics: House Democrats prepare new $2.4 trillion coronavirus relief package.
  4. Health: Cases are surging again in 22 states — New York will conduct its own review of coronavirus vaccine.
  5. Business: America is closing out its strongest quarter of economic growth.
  6. Technology: 2020 tech solutions may be sapping our resolve to beat the pandemic.
  7. Sports: Pac-12 will play this fall despite ongoing pandemic — Here's what college basketball will look like this season.
  8. Science: Global coronavirus vaccine initiative launches without U.S. or China — During COVID-19 shutdown, a common sparrow changed its song.
4 hours ago - Sports

Pac-12 will play football this fall, reversing course

A view of Levi's Stadium during the 2019 Pac-12 Championship football game. Photo: Alika Jenner/Getty Images

The Pac-12, which includes universities in Arizona, California, Colorado, Oregon, Utah and Washington state, will play football starting Nov. 6, reversing its earlier decision to postpone the season because of the coronavirus pandemic.

Why it matters: The conference's about-face follows a similar move by the Big Ten last week and comes as President Trump has publicly pressured sports to resume despite the ongoing pandemic. The Pac-12 will play a seven-game conference football season, according to ESPN.

Get Axios AM in your inbox

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!