Reid Hoffman. Photo: Kelly Sullivan/Getty Images for LinkedIn

Billionaire venture capitalist and LinkedIn co-founder Reid Hoffman apologized on Wednesday for funding a group responsible for spreading disinformation during the Alabama Senate special election last year, according to the Washington Post.

Between the lines: This is the first time Hoffman has acknowledged that he invested $750,000 in American Engagement Technologies, a group that used misleading Facebook pages and other disinformation tactics to target Republican Roy Moore and boost support for Democrat Doug Jones, who ultimately won the close race. Hoffman said in a statement that he was not aware his money was being used for these purposes and that he supports a federal investigation into the matter.

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U.S., Canada and U.K. accuse Russia of trying to steal coronavirus vaccine research

Russian President Vladimir Putin. Photo: Alexei Druzhinin\TASS via Getty Images

Hackers associated with Russian intelligence services are trying to steal information from researchers involved in coronavirus vaccine development, according to a joint advisory by U.K., U.S. and Canadian authorities published Thursday.

The big picture: This isn't the first time a foreign adversary has been accused of attempting to steal COVID-19-related research. U.S. officials in May announced an uptick in Chinese-government affiliated hackers targeting medical research and other facilities in the U.S. for data on a potential cure or effective treatments to combat the virus.

M&A activity falls despite early coronavirus fears

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

In April, several prominent Democrats proposed a moratorium on large mergers and acquisitions. Their argument was that the pandemic would embolden the strong to pounce on the weak, thus reducing competition.

Fast forward: The moratorium never materialized. Nor did the M&A feeding frenzy.

More than 32 million Americans are receiving unemployment benefits

Photo: Jay L. Clendenin / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

More than 32 million Americans are receiving some form of unemployment benefits, according to data released by the Labor Department on Thursday.

Why it matters: Tens of millions of jobless Americans will soon have a smaller cash cushion — as coronavirus cases surge and certain parts of the country re-enter pandemic lockdowns — barring an extension of the more generous unemployment benefits that are set to expire at the end of the month.