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The Trump administration is projected to fall short of its record-low cap on refugee arrivals this year, according to State Department data and projections by World Relief, a humanitarian organization that works to resettle and care for refugees.

Expand chart
Data: U.S. State Department's Refugee Processing Center, 2019 projection by World Relief; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

Why it matters: Since Trump took office, the number of refugees admitted to the U.S. has fallen significantly — as has the share of refugees admitted who are non-Christian. Jenny Yang, senior vice president of advocacy and policy at World Relief, told Axios that the low numbers are due to "cumbersome bureaucracy and delays added upon a process that has worked effectively over the past few years."

By the numbers: At 24,369, there have been slightly more refugees resettled in the U.S. this fiscal year compared to this point last year. But in relation to 2016, the overall number of admitted refugees has fallen by 71%, while the number of Muslim arrivals has fallen by 90%.

  • "The low numbers of religious minorities being resettled contradicts the administration's policies and stated goals to actually help persecuted religious minorities around the world," Yang said.

The big picture: The U.S. resettles more refugees than any other wealthy nation, but Canada and Australia now let in more refugees per capita, Yang said. The U.S. also welcomes some humanitarian immigrants through its asylum process — something the Trump administration has targeted through the Justice Department and executive actions.

Go deeper: Read Axios' deep dive on the refugee crisis

Go deeper

Updated 3 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

  1. Health: Most vulnerable Americans aren't getting enough vaccine information — Fauci says Trump administration's lack of facts on COVID "very likely" cost lives.
  2. Politics: Biden unveils "wartime" COVID strategyBiden's COVID-19 bubble.
  3. Vaccine: Florida requiring proof of residency to get vaccine — CDC extends interval between vaccine doses for exceptional cases.
  4. World: Hong Kong to put tens of thousands on lockdown as cases surge.
  5. Sports: 2021 Tokyo Olympics hang in the balance.
  6. 🎧 Podcast: Carbon Health's CEO on unsticking the vaccine bottleneck.

Trump impeachment trial to start week of Feb. 8, Schumer says

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer. Photo: The Washington Post via Getty

The Senate will begin former President Trump's impeachment trial the week of Feb. 8, Majority Leader Chuck Schumer announced Friday on the Senate floor.

The state of play: Schumer announced the schedule after reaching an agreement with Republicans. The House will transmit the article of impeachment against the former president late Monday.

4 hours ago - Health

CDC extends interval between COVID vaccine doses for exceptional cases

Photo: Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty

Patients can space out the two doses of the coronavirus vaccine by up to six weeks if it’s "not feasible" to follow the shorter recommended window, according to updated guidance from the Centers for Disease and Control and Prevention.

Driving the news: With the prospect of vaccine shortages and a low likelihood that supply will expand before April, the latest changes could provide a path to vaccinate more Americans — a top priority for President Biden.