Get the latest market trends in your inbox

Stay on top of the latest market trends and economic insights with the Axios Markets newsletter. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Minneapolis-St. Paul

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa-St. Petersburg news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa-St. Petersburg

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Photo illustration: Axios Visuals. Photo: Reddit

Reddit isn't the first big tech company to embrace telework after the pandemic. But the platform stands out from its peers because it says it'll pay workers the same salary — no matter where they live.

Why it matters: The catch in the remote work policies at Facebook, Microsoft and other tech companies has been that although employees can choose to work remotely forever and from anywhere, their pay might be cut if they move out of expensive cities to cheaper ones. Reddit is doing away with that snag.

  • I spoke with Nellie Peshkov, Reddit's chief people officer, about the move.
  • "We realized where our employees are doing work has no impact on their performance," Peshkov says. "We want to pay our employees based on that impact, based on that performance."
  • The majority of Reddit's employees don't want to go back to the office full-time, she tells me.

Between the lines: Reddit's policy will apply to new hires as well as veteran employees. So even if you're joining as a new employee from the middle of the country, you'll get paid a Bay Area salary.

  • "I really believe this is going to allow us to increase the diversity of our workforce," says Peshkov.

Worth noting: Peshkov is Reddit's first-ever chief people officer. She previously led the firm's human resources team at the VP level.

  • The company created the chief people officer role amid the pandemic because "it is so critical and important to the success of the company," she says. "People are our most important resource."

Go deeper: The evolution of HR

Go deeper

Erica Pandey, author of @Work
Nov 3, 2020 - Economy & Business

Navigating the post-election workplace

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

In the next 78 days, between the election and the inauguration, politics will become increasingly difficult to avoid at work. Many companies aren't shying away from that.

The big picture: This election cycle marks a turning point for Corporate America. Instead of focusing solely on profits and growth, companies are wading into social and political debates — betting that the future of the workplace is headed that way.

20 mins ago - Health

U.S. exceeds 100,000 COVID-related hospitalizations for the first time

People wait outside the Emergency room of the Garfield Medical Center in Monterey Park, California on Dec 1. Photo: Frederic J. Brown/Getty Images

More than 100,200 Americans were hospitalized as of Wednesday due to the coronavirus for the first time since the outbreak began in early 2020, per the COVID Tracking Project.

The big picture: The milestone comes as health officials anticipated cases to surge due to holiday travel and gatherings. The impact of the holiday remains notable, as many states across the country are only reporting partial data.

4 hours ago - Science

The "war on nature"

A resident stands on his roof as the Blue Ridge Fire burned back in October in Chino Hills, Calif. Photo: Jae C. Hong/AP

Apocalyptic weather is the new normal because humans are "waging war on nature," the UN declared on Wednesday.

What they're saying: "The state of the planet is broken," said UN Secretary-General António Guterres, reports AP. “This is suicidal.”