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Then-White House Chief of Staff Rahm Emanuel walks behind President Obama as they prepare to leave Washington for Chicago in August 2010. Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images

This week is all about power. Power in the Senate. Power in the White House.

Why it matters: If there's a currency in this town, it's power, so we asked several former Washington power brokers to give us their best tips for new members of Congress — as well as a certain incoming president.

Tuesday night: Rahm Emanuel, as told to Axios.

  • "The successful presidents understand the power of public opinion to change Washington, rather than Washington’s ability to change public opinion."
  • "Whenever you are working it, you’ve got to know where people are starting from, and don’t dismiss their politics as wrong. Try and incorporate their politics in your strategy."
  • "There are different power centers, and the media is its own institutional power, whether they like it or not."
  • "You need to know if you’re moving the ball down the field or stopping the ball. The first is harder, by degrees."
  • "You have all of your administration, not just what’s at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, but to wield that power is to have people know that you control it."

Go deeper

Ben Geman, author of Generate
Jan 21, 2021 - Politics & Policy

Falling solar prices give Biden a head start on zero-carbon goal

We've written plenty about the big institutional and political headwinds facing Biden's agenda, so here's one of the tailwinds: falling prices for zero-carbon power tech.

Driving the news: A new analysis looking at one of them finds that utility-scale solar is already the cheapest form of new power generation in 16 states.

In cyber espionage, U.S. is both hunted and hunter

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

American outrage over foreign cyber espionage, like Russia's SolarWinds hack, obscures the uncomfortable reality that the U.S. secretly does just the same thing to other countries.

Why it matters: Secrecy is often necessary in cyber spying to protect sources and methods, preserve strategic edges that may stem from purloined information, and prevent diplomatic incidents.

1 hour ago - Politics & Policy
Scoop

White House plots "full-court press" for $1.9 trillion relief plan

National Economic Council director Brian Deese speaks during a White House news briefing. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

The Biden White House is deploying top officials to get a wide ideological spectrum of lawmakers, governors and mayors on board with the president’s $1.9 trillion COVID relief proposal, according to people familiar with the matter.

Why it matters: The broad, choreographed effort shows just how crucially Biden views the stimulus to the nation's recovery and his own political success.