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Dan Farber / Flickr cc

Raftr, a new startup launched by former Yahoo president Sue Decker, is prepared to take on Facebook and Twitter to become your new favorite social network. Decker and one of Raftr's investors, Harrison Metal founder Michael Dearing, told Kara Swisher, host of Recode Decode, that Raftr cuts through the noise by encouraging users to follow topics rather than people, creating a more conversational environment versus the self-promotional experience and one-way dialogue you may get on other sites.

"Using Raftr is like going to a really great dinner party where there's little rooms talking about different topics and you can move from room to room... it's not a shouting fest, it's not megaphones. It's a conversation." — Raftr investor Michael Dearing.

Decker added that the success of sites like Slack and Nextdoor have proved that Facebook and Twitter aren't the "end-all be-all" of social media. Rather Raftr presents a new opportunity for people to find like-minded users they can connect with on a series of subjects.

Go deeper

23 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Vaccinations, relief timing dominate Sweet 16 call

Sen. Joe Manchin (D-W.V.) speaks during a news conference in December with a group of bipartisan lawmakers. Photo: Caroline Brehman/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

Vaccine distribution, pandemic data and a cross-party comity dominated today's virtual meeting between White House officials and a bipartisan group of 16 senators, Senator Angus King told Axios.

Why it matters: Given Democrats' razor-thin majority in both chambers of Congress, President Biden will have to rely heavily on this group of centrist lawmakers — dubbed the "Sweet 16" — to pass any substantial legislation.

Progressives pressure Schumer to end filibuster

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer. Photo: Win McNamee / Getty Images

A progressive coalition is pressuring Chuck Schumer on his home turf by running a digital billboard in Times Square urging the new majority leader to end the Senate filibuster.

Why it matters: Schumer is up for re-election in 2o22 and could face a challenger, and he's also spearheading his party's broader effort to hold onto its narrow congressional majorities.

5 hours ago - Health

U.S. surpasses 25 million COVID cases

A mass COVID-19 vaccination site at Dodger Stadium on Jan. 22 in Los Angeles, California. Photo: Mario Tama/Getty Images

The U.S has confirmed more than 25 million coronavirus cases, per Johns Hopkins data updated on Sunday.

The big picture: President Biden has said he expects the country's death toll to exceed 500,000 people by next month, as the rate of deaths due to the virus continues to escalate.