Ina Fried Dec 4
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Qualcomm makes another bid to get inside the PC

Qualcomm's Cristiano Amon leads the company's chipmaking unit. Photo illustration: Axios Visuals

Not for the first time, Qualcomm is trying to find a place inside the personal computer.

The last time was a flop, in large part because the operating system — Windows RT — didn't really run all the programs people expect from their computer. Flash forward a couple of years and Microsoft and Qualcomm are taking another swing, promising that in the new crop of always connected PCs, you will get cellular connectivity in a thin, light device with all-day battery life — and it will run all the Windows apps people care about.

Why it matters: Qualcomm is facing increasing pressure in its core mobile phone business as market leaders Samsung and Apple increasingly look to others. Getting even a small slice of the PC business could be a big deal.

Cristiano Amon, the executive who runs Qualcomm's chip business, spoke with Axios ahead of Tuesday's event.

Here are some of his key points:

  • Microsoft and Qualcomm learned their lesson from Windows RT. "There is no second class version of Windows – there's only one Windows. Every single app that people care about will work."
  • The always connected PCs should have all-day battery life or more and start at $600 to $800. "Those are prices with high-speed cellular modem, not Wi-Fi only. We think that's going to be competitive."
  • They're competing with tablets to be your third device (after main PC and phone). "If you have a tablet as a third device, I will argue this is a better experience than a tablet. It is a full, connected PC."
  • Qualcomm doesn't have to dominate the PC market for it to be a win. "We don't participate (today). Even if we get a smaller share, it is a great outcome for us."

More details: Qualcomm and Microsoft will be going into more detail on the new PCs at an event in Maui this week.

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What McCabe told Mueller

Photo: Pete Marovich / Getty Images

Andrew McCabe says President Trump asked him: “What was it like when your wife lost? ... So tell me, what was it like to lose?" McCabe — the former FBI deputy director who was fired Friday night, 26 hours short of being eligible for a full pension — says that in three or four interactions, President Trump was disparaging each time of his wife, Dr. Jill McCabe, a failed Virginia state Senate candidate in 2015. John Dowd, a Trump lawyer, told me: "I am told that the P never made that statement according to two others who were present."

The big picture: Axios has learned that McCabe has met with special counsel Robert Mueller, and has turned over Comey-style memos documenting his conversations with Trump. The memos include corroboration by McCabe of former FBI Director James Comey's account of his own firing by Trump.

Haley Britzky 7 hours ago
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Women and jihad: from bride to the front line

Suspected Al Qaeda-aligned Shabaab militants, a woman and her three children, sit next to weapons after their arrest on May 5, 2016 in Mogadishu
Suspected Al Qaeda-aligned Shabaab militants, a woman and her children, sit next to weapons after their arrest on May 5, 2016 in Mogadishu. Photo: Mohamed Abdiwahab / AFP / Getty Images

A women's magazine, unveiled in December, gives tips on how to be a "good bride" and make life easier for the man in your life. The twist: the magazine, "Beituki," is published by al-Qaeda as part of a propaganda campaign which "appears, in part, to be a reaction to Islamic State (IS), which has called women to the front lines," per the Economist.

The big picture: Extremist organizations are struggling to define what women's roles in their groups should be. While some force women to "remain indoors," as Beituki suggests, others have placed women on the front lines, or utilized them as recruiters.