Ina Fried Apr 11
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Qualcomm fires back at Apple suit, seeks damages of its own

Raimond Spekking via Wikimedia Commons

Qualcomm formally responded to a lawsuit from Apple on Monday, rejecting the iPhone maker's claims and launching its own countersuit. (Sources had told Recode that a countersuit was likely.) Among Qualcomm's charges are that Apple:

  • Breached agreements and mischaracterized agreements and negotiations with Qualcomm;
  • Interfered with agreements that Qualcomm had with the contract manufacturers who build Apple's iPads and iPhones
  • Encouraged various government regulatory agencies around the world to launch inquires against Qualcomm "by misrepresenting facts and making false statements"
  • Qualcomm also said Apple chose not to utilize the full capability of Qualcomm's modem chip in the iPhone 7, while also misleading people on the performance difference between its modem and a rival chip from Intel and then threatened Qualcomm to try to prevent it from making its own performance claims.

The background: Apple sued Qualcomm for $1 billion in January, saying the chipmaker was overcharging for use of its patented technology and failing to make required payments. The U.S. Federal Trade Commission sued Qualcomm in January in the waning days of the Obama Administration, charging it violated antitrust law. As part of its response, Qualcomm maintains Apple's complaints to regulators released the company of its obligation to make certain payments.

Steve LeVine 5 hours ago
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Self-driving lab head urges freeze after "nightmare" fatality

Uber self-driving car in Pittsburgh. Photo: Jeff Swensen / Getty

Carmakers and technology companies should freeze their race to field autonomous vehicles because "clearly the technology is not where it needs to be," said Raj Rajkumar, head of Carnegie Mellon University's leading self-driving laboratory.

What he said: Speaking a few hours after a self-driven vehicle ran over and killed a pedestrian in Arizona, Rajkumar said, "This isn't like a bug with your phone. People can get killed. Companies need to take a deep breath. The technology is not there yet. We need to keep people in the loop."

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Trump, Sessions & GOP lawmakers to meet about sanctuary cities

Jeff Sessions claps behind Donald Trump's blurry profile at a speech
Attorney General Jeff Sesssions, Donald Trump, Melania Trump. Photo: Mandel Ngan / Getty

The White House is hosting a roundtable on sanctuary cities Tuesday afternoon with the President, Attorney General Jeff Sessions, Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen of the Department of Homeland Security, Republican lawmakers and others, Axios has learned.

Why it matters: Conservatives tried to use this week’s massive government spending bill to cut federal funds from sanctuary cities, but they failed, according to sources involved in the process. But Trump officials want to use Tuesday’s event to highlight the issue and put pressure on cities that don't comply with federal immigration law enforcement.