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Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-Ill.) said on CNN's "Reliable Sources" Sunday that Republican leaders must denounce QAnon now that a supporter of the far-right conspiracy theory has won a congressional runoff and is set to enter Congress in the next election.

Why it matters: Very few, if any, Republicans have been outspoken against QAnon, which baselessly claims that a powerful cabal of sex traffickers within the "deep state" is fighting to take down President Trump.

  • The president has yet to condemn the theory and refused to answer a direct question last week about whether or not he supports QAnon.
  • The FBI identified fringe conspiracy theories, like QAnon, as domestic terrorist threats in 2019, according to Yahoo News.

The state of play: Kinzinger spoke out about the conspiracy theory last week, saying it has "no place in Congress" after vocal QAnon supporter Marjorie Taylor Greene won Georgia's 14th district congressional runoff.

  • Greene has previously been condemned by GOP leadership after videos of her making offensive remarks about Black people, Jews and Muslims surfaced on Facebook.
  • Now that she is poised to enter Congress, however, a spokesperson for House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) said that she will be welcomed into the House GOP conference if she wins in November.
  • Green is one of at least 11 GOP congressional nominees who have publicly supported or defended the QAnon conspiracy theory movement.

What he's saying: "Up to maybe about a week ago, there wasn't a reason to denounce it because it didn't need the attention," Kinzinger said.

  • "But now that it's made mainstream — we have a candidate that embraces it that won a primary. I supported her primary opponent, the president hasn't fully denounced it or denounced it at all. Now it's time for leaders to come out and denounce it."
  • "The key here isn't Democrats denouncing it. It's Republicans denouncing it. Democrats and Republicans have to denounce extremism in their own party. That's where it's effective. It's not going to be effective from the other side denouncing it. It just emboldens them."

Go deeper: Read more about QAnon's 2020 resurgence

Go deeper

All eyes — and $$$ — on Georgia

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Brace yourself for Part II of the 2020 election — it starts today, in Georgia. Hundreds of millions of dollars are about to pour into the Peach State, now that control of the Senate — and the fate of the next president's agenda — hinges on runoffs for not one but both of the state's seats, set for Jan. 5.

Why it matters: If Joe Biden goes to the White House, the outcomes of these races will determine whether he can move aggressively to enact Democratic policy priorities and confirm his top cabinet and judicial nominees.

Mike Allen, author of AM
2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Biden's "overwhelming force" doctrine

President-elect Biden arrives to introduce his science team in Wilmington yesterday. Photo: Kevin Lamarque/Reuters

President-elect Biden has ordered up a shock-and-awe campaign for his first days in office to signal, as dramatically as possible, the radical shift coming to America and global affairs, his advisers tell us. 

The plan, Part 1 ... Biden, as detailed in a "First Ten Days" memo from incoming chief of staff Ron Klain, plans to unleash executive orders, federal powers and speeches to shift to a stark, national plan for "100 million shots" in three months.

Off the Rails

Episode 2: Barbarians at the Oval

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Photo: Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

Beginning on election night 2020 and continuing through his final days in office, Donald Trump unraveled and dragged America with him, to the point that his followers sacked the U.S. Capitol with two weeks left in his term. This Axios series takes you inside the collapse of a president.

Episode 2: Trump stops buying what his professional staff are telling him, and increasingly turns to radical voices telling him what he wants to hear. Read episode 1.

President Trump plunked down in an armchair in the White House residence, still dressed from his golf game — navy fleece, black pants, white MAGA cap. It was Saturday, Nov. 7. The networks had just called the election for Joe Biden.