The stage at the ninth Democratic primary debate in Las Vegas. Photo: Bridget Bennett/AFP via Getty Images

The first presidential debate on Sept. 29 will be moved from the University of Notre Dame in Indiana to a Cleveland site co-hosted by Case Western Reserve University and Cleveland Clinic due to coronavirus concerns, organizers announced Monday.

Why it matters: This is another reminder that the coronavirus has changed the presidential election as we know it.

  • The debate format is still up in the air, but it could mirror the final Democratic primary debate between Joe Biden and Sen. Bernie Sanders, which had no live studio audience.

What they're saying: Notre Dame President Rev. John Jenkins said in a statement that the university made "this difficult decision because the necessary health precautions would have greatly diminished the educational value of hosting the debate on our campus."

  • Jenkins explained that "the inevitable reduction in student attendance in the debate hall, volunteer opportunities and ancillary educational events undermined the primary benefit of hosting — to provide our students with a meaningful opportunity to engage in the American political process."

Go deeper

Updated 8 hours ago - Health

U.S. coronavirus updates

Data: The COVID Tracking Project; Note: Does not include probable deaths from New York City; Map: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

Seven players and six staff members from the St. Louis Cardinals have tested positive for the coronavirus over the past week, prompting the MLB to postpone the team's upcoming four-game series against the Detroit Tigers.

The big picture: Former FDA commissioner Scott Gottlieb told CNBC’s "Squawk Box" that coronavirus outbreaks in the MLB are "a warning of what could potentially happen if we aren't very careful with the schools."

Axios-Ipsos poll: Fear of voting

Data: Axios/Ipsos poll; Note: ±3.0% margin of error for the total sample; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

Democrats are twice as likely as Republicans to worry about in-person voting — with nearly two in three seeing it as a large or moderate risk to their health — according to this week's installment of the Axios-Ipsos Coronavirus Index.

Why it matters: This could pose a significant disadvantage for Joe Biden and other Democratic candidates in November if the pattern holds — especially in states where high infection rates persist, or where there are significant hurdles to mail-in, absentee or early voting.

Trump: Coronavirus is “under control"

President Trump said in an interview with “Axios on HBO” that he thinks the coronavirus is as well-controlled in the U.S. as it can be, despite dramatic surges in new infections over the course of the summer and more than 150,000 American deaths.

  • “They are dying, that's true. And you have — it is what it is. But that doesn't mean we aren't doing everything we can. It's under control as much as you can control it. This is a horrible plague,” he told Axios' Jonathan Swan.