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Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis waves to supporters during a rally for President Trump last week. Photo: Jonathan Bachman/Getty Images

Florida's $30 million contract to set up and operate a drug importation program didn't attract any private firms by its September deadline, Kaiser Health News reports.

Why it matters: The lack of vendor interest delays Florida's attempt to become the first state to import some drugs from Canada under recently finalized federal rules.

The big picture: The Trump administration has allowed states to apply for federal permission to import prescription drugs from Canada, where prices are lower because the country limits how much drugmakers can charge.

  • Florida's goal is to help lower drug prices for people covered by state programs such as Medicaid and the Corrections Department, and it projects savings of up to $150 million a year.
  • Vermont, Colorado, Maine, New Hampshire and New Mexico are also planning to set up importation programs. The federal rules take effect Nov. 30, which is when states can formally apply to HHS to set up their program.

What they're saying: “The agency remains confident it will find a qualified vendor soon,” a spokesperson for the Florida Agency for Health Care Administration tells Axios. The state had planned to award a contract in December.

Go deeper

Updated Nov 9, 2020 - Health

23 states set single-day coronavirus case records last week

Data: Compiled by Axios; Map: Danielle Alberti/Axios

23 states set new highs last week for coronavirus infections recorded in a single day, according to the COVID Tracking Project (CTP) and state health departments. 15 states surpassed records from the previous week.

Why it matters: More states across the country are handling record-high caseloads than this summer.

Biden plans to ask public to wear masks for first 100 days in office

Joe Biden. Photo: Mark Makela/Gettu Images

President-elect Joe Biden told CNN on Thursday that he plans to ask the American public to wear face masks for the first 100 days of his presidency.

The big picture: Biden also stated he has asked NIAID director Anthony Fauci to stay on in his current role, serve as a chief medical adviser and be part of his COVID-19 response team when he takes office early next year.

What COVID-19 vaccine trials still need to do

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

COVID-19 vaccines are being developed at record speed, but some experts fear the accelerated regulatory process could interfere with ongoing research about the vaccines.

Why it matters: Even after the first COVID-19 vaccines are deployed, scientific questions will remain about how they are working and how to improve them.