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"High walls and bigger moats" are obsolete. Photo: Bill Hinton / Contributor / Getty

Humans are no longer sufficient to police cyber attackers, experts tell Axios, and machines must move in to find them.

Quick take: "High walls and bigger moats" are obsolete in computer security, says Mark Testoni, CEO of NS2, the U.S. arm of German software giant SAP. Instead, people, governments and organizations housing sensitive material on their computers should "presume that intruders are already inside," he tells Axios.

  • We have seen over the last few years that determined attackers can penetrate even agencies with ostensibly the greatest protections, like the U.S. National Security Agency.
  • AI firms, Testoni said, must develop tools to find and isolate intruders presumed to be lying inside sensitive systems, whether active or dormant.

What's next: Geopolitical players — the U.S., Russia, China, North Korea, Iran and Israel, to name a few — are in overdrive developing their cyber capabilities. One of the next frontiers for AI is to develop ways to predict the source and targets of future attacks.

Go deeper

Chauvin defense closing: "Does not have to prove his innocence"

Chauvin's defense attorney Eric Nelson opened his closing argument on Monday by reminding the jury that Derek Chauvin "does not have to prove his innocence."

Why it matters: The jury's verdict in Chauvin's murder trial is seen by advocates as one of the most crucial civil rights cases in decades.

Merrick Garland: Domestic terror is "still with us"

Photo: Kevin Dietsch/UPI/Bloomberg via Getty Images

In his first major speech, Attorney General Merrick Garland warned the nation Monday to remain vigilant against the rising threat of domestic extremism.

Why it matters: Domestic terrorism poses an "elevated threat" to the nation this year, according to U.S. intelligence. Garland has already pledged to crack down on violence linked to white supremacists and right-wing militia groups.