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U.S. Postmaster General Louis Dejoy in Congress on Aug. 5. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

Postmaster General Louis DeJoy announced a reorganization of the U.S. Postal Service's leadership on Friday, shifting top personnel and pushing structural changes, according to the Washington Post.

Why it matters: The restructure, which reassigns or displaces postal executives, including two officials who oversee day-to-day operations, comes amid increased scrutiny from Democratic lawmakers, who fear that DeJoy's changes could threaten the use of mail-in ballots for the November election.

  • Earlier this summer, DeJoy — a major donor to President Trump’s campaign efforts — implemented a number of cost-cutting measures, including prohibiting overtime and altered delivery policies — changes that Democrats fear will hamstring deliveries.

What they're saying: DeJoy told USPS' Board of Governors on Friday that, "If public policy makers choose to utilize the mail as a part of their election system, we will do everything we can to deliver Election Mail in a timely manner consistent with our operational standards.

  • "We do ask election officials and voters to be mindful of the time that it takes for us to deliver ballots, whether it is a blank ballot going to a voter or a completed ballot going back to election officials."
  • He added that "standards have not changed, and despite any assertions to the contrary, we are not slowing down Election Mail or any other mail. Instead, we continue to employ a robust and proven process to ensure proper handling of all Election Mail."

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer wrote in a letter to DeJoy on Thursday that they "believe these changes, made during the middle of a once-in-a-century pandemic, now threaten the timely delivery of mail — including medicines for seniors, paychecks for workers, and absentee ballots for voters."

  • "We believe these changes must be reversed."

The big picture: Trump meanwhile has relentlessly claimed that mail-in ballots will produce voter fraud and "rig" the election, but has not provided evidence for his fears.

  • The House Oversight Committee called on DeJoy to testify about these changes on Sept. 17.

Go deeper

Nov 13, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Trump: "Time will tell" who won the 2020 election

President Trump. Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

President Trump said Friday that “time will tell” who won the 2020 election, declining to concede the race in his first public remarks since it became clear he’d lost the election to Joe Biden.

What he's saying: "This administration will not be going into a lockdown," Trump said, insisting that so long as he is president there will not be a nationwide coronavirus lockdown. "Hopefully, whatever happens in the future — who knows which administration it will be. I guess time will tell," he added.

Nov 13, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Pennsylvania secretary of state says she won't order recount

Election workers count ballots at the Philadelphia Convention Center. Photo: Chris McGrath/Getty Images

Pennsylvania Secretary of State Kathy Boockvar said on Friday that based on unofficial returns, she will not order a recount or recanvass of ballots cast in the 2020 election, including in the presidential race.

Why it matters: President Trump, who has not publicly conceded to President-elect Joe Biden, continues to litigate election results, including in Pennsylvania.

USAID chief tests positive for coronavirus

An Air Force cargo jet delivers USAID supplies to Russia earlier this year. Photo: Mikhail Metzel/TASS via Getty Images

The acting administrator of the United States Agency for International Development informed senior staff Wednesday he has tested positive for coronavirus, two sources familiar with the call tell Axios.

Why it matters: John Barsa, who staffers say rarely wears a mask in their office, is the latest in a series of senior administration officials to contract the virus. His positive diagnosis comes amid broader turmoil at the agency following the election.