U.S. Postmaster General Louis Dejoy in Congress on Aug. 5. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

Postmaster General Louis DeJoy announced a reorganization of the U.S. Postal Service's leadership on Friday, shifting top personnel and pushing structural changes, according to the Washington Post.

Why it matters: The restructure, which reassigns or displaces postal executives, including two officials who oversee day-to-day operations, comes amid increased scrutiny from Democratic lawmakers, who fear that DeJoy's changes could threaten the use of mail-in ballots for the November election.

  • Earlier this summer, DeJoy — a major donor to President Trump’s campaign efforts — implemented a number of cost-cutting measures, including prohibiting overtime and altered delivery policies — changes that Democrats fear will hamstring deliveries.

What they're saying: DeJoy told USPS' Board of Governors on Friday that, "If public policy makers choose to utilize the mail as a part of their election system, we will do everything we can to deliver Election Mail in a timely manner consistent with our operational standards.

  • "We do ask election officials and voters to be mindful of the time that it takes for us to deliver ballots, whether it is a blank ballot going to a voter or a completed ballot going back to election officials."
  • He added that "standards have not changed, and despite any assertions to the contrary, we are not slowing down Election Mail or any other mail. Instead, we continue to employ a robust and proven process to ensure proper handling of all Election Mail."

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer wrote in a letter to DeJoy on Thursday that they "believe these changes, made during the middle of a once-in-a-century pandemic, now threaten the timely delivery of mail — including medicines for seniors, paychecks for workers, and absentee ballots for voters."

  • "We believe these changes must be reversed."

The big picture: Trump meanwhile has relentlessly claimed that mail-in ballots will produce voter fraud and "rig" the election, but has not provided evidence for his fears.

  • The House Oversight Committee called on DeJoy to testify about these changes on Sept. 17.

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Sep 17, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Exclusive: MTV to pay for ballot registration requests

Photo Illustration by Alvin Chan/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

MTV will pay for the printing and postage of any ballot application requested through websites linked to its new voter initiative campaign, network executives tell Axios.

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  3. Politics: Former Pence aide says she plans to vote for Joe Biden, accusing Trump of costing lives in his coronavirus response.
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Scoop: How the Oracle-TikTok deal would work

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

An agreement between TikTok's Chinese owner ByteDance and Oracle includes a variety of concessions in an effort to make the deal palatable to the Trump administration and security hawks in Congress, according to a source close to the companies.

Driving the news: The deal, in the form of a 20-page term sheet agreed to in principle by the companies, would give Oracle unprecedented access and control over user data as well as other measures designed to ensure that Americans' data is protected, according to the source.