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Former Secretary of State Mike Pompeo. Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

The State Department's independent watchdog found that former Secretary of State Mike Pompeo violated federal ethics rules when he and his wife asked department employees to perform personal tasks on more than 100 occasions, including picking up their dog and making private dinner reservations.

Why it matters: The report comes as Pompeo pours money into a new political group amid speculation about a possible 2024 presidential run.

What they're saying: "OIG found evidence of over 100 requests to Department employees that are inconsistent with the Standards of Ethical Conduct for Employees of the Executive Branch or raised questions about the proper use of Department resources," the State Department’s inspector general found as first reported by Politico.

  • "These requests from the Pompeos, which fell into three broad categories —requests to pick up personal items, planning of events unrelated to the Department’s mission, and miscellaneous personal requests — had no apparent connection to the official business of the Department."
  • Examples included taking care of their dog, helping write a letter of recommendation for a medical school application, booking salon appointments and making private dinner reservations, per the report.

Pompeo's attorney denied the allegations against his client and called the report "false."

  • “The poor quality of the report bespeaks not merely unprofessionalism in its drafting but also bias, which we are concerned may be politically motivated," Pompeo's lawyer, William Burck, said in a response appended to the report.

What's next: The report did not call for any disciplinary action against Pompeo because he is no longer in office, but did recommend steps the State Department should take to "mitigate the risk of future senior leaders committing similar violations."

Go deeper

Scoop: Mike Pompeo pours cash into new PAC bearing his slogan

Michael Pompeo, former U.S. Secretary of State, speaks during a breakfast with the Westside Conservative Club in Urbandale, Iowa, on Friday, March 26, 2021 (Rachel Mummey/Bloomberg)

Former Secretary of State Mike Pompeo is pouring money into a new political group amid speculation about a possible 2024 presidential run, records show.

Why it matters: Champion American Values, formed in February, is the same phrase that Pompeo has been using lately including during remarks last month to an influential group of Republicans in Iowa, seen as a clear sign he's considering a 2024 bid.

$1.2 trillion "hard" infrastructure bill clears major procedural vote in Senate

Photo: Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images

The Senate voted 67-32 on Wednesday to advance the bipartisan $1.2 trillion infrastructure bill.

Why it matters: After weeks of negotiating, portions of the bill remain unwritten, but the Senate can now start debating the legislation to resolve outstanding issues.

Fed chair says he isn't concerned by Delta surge

Fed Chairman Jerome Powell at the G20 finance ministers and central bankers meeting in Venice last month. Photo: Andreas Solaro/AFP via Getty Images

One of the country's most influential economic officials doesn't anticipate that surging coronavirus cases will knock the reopening recovery off course.

What he's saying: "There has tended to be less economic implications from each [coronavirus] wave. We'll see if that's the case for the Delta variety," Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell told reporters today.