Photo: Win McNamee / Getty Images

CIA Director and President Trump's pick to become Secretary of State Mike Pompeo has been referred to by the The New York Times as the "most openly political spy chief in a generation," as well as one of President Trump's favorite cabinet members.

Why it matters: Ousted Secretary of State Rex Tillerson and President Trump disagreed on virtually every question of foreign policy. But as Trump told reporters at the White House this morning, he and Pompeo "are almost always on the same wavelength," indicating that the State Department will likely take a more hard-line approach to foreign policy under his leadership.

North Korea

Per the New York Times, Pompeo has come as close as any Trump administration official to calling for regime change in North Korea. He has said that “the thing that is most dangerous about [North Korea] is the character who holds the control over” its nuclear arsenal.

Russia

During his confirmation hearing, Pompeo claimed Russia has "reasserted itself aggressively, invading and occupying Ukraine, threatening Europe, and doing nothing to aid in the destruction and defeat of ISIS." On questions of election interference, Pompeo has said there's no doubt the Kremlin meddled, but downplayed the effect it had on the election's outcome.

Israel

A strong supporter of the Israeli government throughout his six years in Congress, Pompeo visited the country in 2015 and heaped praise on Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and the Israel's police for their courage in the face of terrorism.

Iran

Pompeo has pointed to Iran as the main instigator of conflict in the Middle East since 1979 and repeatedly slammed the Obama administration for championing the Iran nuclear deal, per The Times of Israel. Following his appointment to the CIA, Pompeo tweeted, “I look forward to rolling back this disastrous deal with the world’s largest state sponsor of terrorism.”

Go deeper

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Trump says he will announce Supreme Court pick on Saturday

Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

President Trump tweeted Tuesday that he plans to announce his Supreme Court pick on Saturday. He later told reporters that the announcement will come at 5 p.m.

Why it matters: Republicans are moving fast to replace the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, which would tilt the balance of the high court in conservatives' favor and have lasting impact on climate policy, immigration and the Affordable Care Act.

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Remote work won't kill your office

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

We can officially declare the 9-to-5, five-days-a-week, in-office way of working dead. But offices themselves aren't dead. And neither are cities.

The big picture: Since the onset of pandemic-induced telework, companies have oscillated between can't-wait-to-go-back and work-from-home-forever. Now, it's becoming increasingly clear that the future of work will land somewhere in the middle — a remote/in-person hybrid.

FBI: Foreign actors likely to sow disinformation about delays in election results

Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The FBI and Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency released a public service announcement on Tuesday warning that mail-in ballots "could leave officials with incomplete results on election night," and that foreign actors are likely to spread disinformation about the delays.

The bottom line: The agencies called on the public to "critically evaluate the sources of the information they consume and to seek out reliable and verified information from trusted sources," including state and local election officials.

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