Photo: Natalia Fedosenko\TASS via Getty Images.

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said in a speech to the National Governors Association Saturday that governors should be vigilant in their business interactions with China, warning that they're each being methodically analyzed and lobbied by the Communist Party, Politico reports.

Why it matters: Pompeo, who has helped shape the Trump administration's hawkish stance toward China, was seeking to highlight how competition with Beijing is not just a federal issue.

What he's saying: "When it comes to doing business, I’m asking you to adopt a cautious mindset," Pompeo said, according to Reuters. "In the words of President Reagan, when you are approached for introduction or a connection to a deal, ‘trust but verify.'"

  • "[W]hether you are viewed by the [Communist Party of China] as friendly or hardline, know that it’s working you, know that it’s working the team around you," he added. "Competition with China is happening inside of your state, and it affects our capacity to perform America’s vital national security functions."

Between the lines: While phase one of a trade deal between the U.S. and China was signed in January, the two countries have still not resolved disputes over IP theft, spying and other broader issues.

  • Just last month, prosecutors charged Charles Lieber, chair of the Harvard University chemistry department, with lying about funds he obtained through a Chinese government recruitment program.

Go deeper: The FBI is walking a tightrope on China

Go deeper

Caitlin Owens, author of Vitals
30 mins ago - Health

The coronavirus is starting to crush some hospitals

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Some states are seeing dangerous levels of coronavirus hospitalizations, with hospitals warning that they could soon become overwhelmed if no action is taken to slow the spread.

Why it matters: Patients can only receive good care if there's enough care to go around — which is one reason why the death rate was so much higher in the spring, some experts say.

Scoop: The Lincoln Project is becoming a media business

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

The Lincoln Project is looking to beef up its media business after the election, sources tell Axios.

Driving the news: The group recently signed with the United Talent Agency (UTA) to help build out Lincoln Media and is weighing offers from different television studios, podcast networks and book publishers.

Trump, Biden strategies revealed in final ad push

Data: Bully Pulpit Interactive; Chart: Danielle Alberti/Axios

President Trump is pouring hundreds of thousands of dollars into Facebook ads on the Supreme Court and conservative judges in the final stretch of his campaign, while Joe Biden is spending over a million on voter mobilization, according to an analysis by Axios using data from Bully Pulpit Interactive.

The big picture: Trump's Facebook ad messaging has fluctuated dramatically in conjunction with the news cycle throughout his campaign, while Biden's messaging has been much more consistent, focusing primarily on health care and the economy.