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Trump supporters at a rally in Reading, Pa. Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images.

Some of President Trump’s own supporters are not convinced he won the 2020 election, with one in 10 of them saying they think Joe Biden will be the next president, according to a new poll from a bipartisan group focused on strengthening democratic institutions.

Why it matters: With mail-in voting expanding Biden's lead and the president promising legal battles in several states, perceptions of the results are starting to form, according to the survey by Citizens for a Strong Democracy. The group is led by former Department of Homeland Security secretaries from both parties.

  • Some 43% of respondents remain unclear about the outcome, with 37 percent believing Biden won and 18% thinking Trump did.
  • Among Trump voters, 37% think he won the race, but 10% think Biden did.
  • By contrast, 64% of Biden’s voters believe their candidate is the victor.
  • By a nearly five-to-one ratio (42% to 9%), independent voters named Biden the winner.

The big picture: Some 80 percent of respondents in the 1,000 voter survey, conducted by phone during the two days after the election, say they will accept its outcome.

  • State elections officials received a 67% approval rating on handling the situation since Election Day, including 54% from Trump supporters.

But but but: There's real concern about election-related violence, with 85 percent thinking “violence is occurring or will occur as a result of this election.”

  • Some 92% agree “violence because of the results of an election is never acceptable.”

Go deeper

Updated Dec 1, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Barr says DOJ has not seen evidence of fraud that would change election results

Photo: Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Attorney General Bill Barr told AP on Tuesday that the Department of Justice has not uncovered evidence of widespread voter fraud that would change the outcome of the 2020 presidential election.

Why it matters: It's a direct repudiation of President Trump's baseless claims of a "rigged" election from one of the most loyal members of his Cabinet.

Georgia election official to Trump: Condemn “potential acts of violence”

Gabriel Sterling. Photo: Jessica McGowan via Getty

Gabriel Sterling, Georgia’s voting implementation manager, called on President Trump and the state's Republican senators to denounce threats against election workers in a press conference on Tuesday.

Why it matters: State election workers have been the recipients of death threats after conspiracy theorists shared false videos about the election results on social media. Trump and his allies continue to claim widespread election fraud took place in the state.

What COVID-19 vaccine trials still need to do

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

COVID-19 vaccines are being developed at record speed, but some experts fear the accelerated regulatory process could interfere with ongoing research about the vaccines.

Why it matters: Even after the first COVID-19 vaccines are deployed, scientific questions will remain about how they are working and how to improve them.