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President Trump at the White House on June 17. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

74% of Americans say the country is heading in the wrong direction, including 63% of Republicans — up from 42% in May, according to a new poll by the AP-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.

Why it matters: President Trump generally enjoys strong approval ratings within the Republican Party, but the state of the country may be eroding some of that support.

  • "Presidents seeking four more years in office typically rely on voters being optimistic about the direction the country is headed and eager to stay the course — a view most Americans don’t currently hold," AP's Julie Pace and Emily Swanson report.

The big picture: Most Americans polled by AP-NORC were pessimistic about the country's trajectory amid competing crises of outrage against racial injustice and police brutality, a global pandemic and sustained high unemployment.

What they found: 54% of Americans — and 22% of Republicans — said that President Trump has made things worse after the killing of George Floyd and following weeks of protest, per AP.

  • 37% of Americans approved of Trump's handling of the coronavirus pandemic, down from 44% in March.
  • 64% of Americans said that Trump's presidency has made the country more divided — including 37% of Republicans.

Methodology: The AP-NORC polled 1,310 adults from June 11-15 with a sample from NORC’s probability-based AmeriSpeak Panel, which is designed to be representative of the U.S. population. Margin of error ± 3.7%.

Go deeper: Poll shows Biden leads Trump in six swing states

Go deeper

Sep 22, 2020 - World

Poll finds bipartisan consensus on sanctioning China over human rights abuses

Data: The Chicago Council on Global Affairs; Note: Total survey sample of 2,011, with a ±2.3% margin of error for the full sample; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

Democrats and Republicans have sharply differing views on some aspects of foreign policy and national security. But when it comes to China, there is some degree of consensus, according to a new survey by the Chicago Council on Global Affairs.

Details: There is widespread support across party lines for sanctions to combat China's human rights violations, as well as measures to protect Americans from the potential risks of Chinese technology.

Updated 7 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Health: Large coronavirus outbreaks leading to high death rates — Coronavirus cases are at an all-time high ahead of Election Day — U.S. tops 88,000 COVID-19 cases, setting new single-day record.
  2. Politics: States beg for Warp Speed billions.
  3. World: Taiwan reaches a record 200 days with no local coronavirus cases.
  4. 🎧Podcast: The vaccine race turns toward nationalism.

Technical glitch in Facebook's ad tools creates political firestorm

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg. Photo: SOPA Images / Contributor

Facebook said late Thursday that a mix of "technical problems" and confusion among advertisers around its new political ad ban rules caused issues affecting ad campaigns of both parties.

Why it matters: A report out Thursday morning suggested the ad tools were causing campaign ads, even those that adhered to Facebook's new rules, to be paused. Very quickly, political campaigners began asserting the tech giant was enforcing policies in a way that was biased against their campaigns.