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President Trump speaks during an event on police reform in the Rose Garden. Photo: Evan Vucci/AP

President Trump hinted on Tuesday at a small potential area of bipartisan consensus on policing.

Why it matters: America's police departments do a bad job of keeping bad cops off the streets, with unsurprising and unacceptable results.

  • Systemic racism is real, and America's police disproportionately target black men in a way that white people are finally beginning to recognize.

On Tuesday in the Rose Garden, Trump said there are a "small number of bad police officers. ... They are very tiny. I use the word 'tiny.' It is a very small percentage. But you have them."

  • He was there to sign a modest executive order limiting the use of chokeholds and moves to create a national database for police misconduct," Axios' Alayna Treene reports.
  • The order also pushes for de-escalation training, which Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms called for on Monday.
  • "You've got to get cops to understand that it's not a cowardly act, that backing off could save this person's life," said Tom Manger, a retired police chief in Virginia and Maryland and former president of the Major Cities Chiefs Association.

Between the lines: Both of the police officers involved in recent high-profile killings of black men had previous incidents that should have raised flags.

  • Garrett Rolfe: "The former Atlanta police officer who fatally shot Rayshard Brooks in a Wendy's parking lot faced disciplinary action in 2016 for a use-of-force incident involving a firearm, according to department records."
  • Derek Chauvin: "The former Minneapolis police officer charged with murder in the death of George Floyd shot one suspect, was involved in the fatal shooting of another, and received at least 17 complaints during his nearly two decades with the department, according to police records and archived news reports."

The bottom line: Police departments in general need work. Police used tear gas on protesters in 98 cities across 35 states in the weeks since George Floyd was killed, the New York Times.

Go deeper: Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan on reopening in the midst of protests

Go deeper

Louisville declares state of emergency as Breonna Taylor decision looms

A demonstrator holds up a sign of Breonna Taylor during a protest in Louisville, Kentucky. Photo: Brandon Bell/Getty Images

Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer declared a state of emergency Tuesday "due to the potential for civil unrest" ahead of Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron's expected announcement on the Breonna Taylor case.

Of note: Louisville has witnessed more than 115 days of protests over the police killing of Taylor, an unarmed Black woman, with calls for all the officers involved to be charged.

Updated Sep 24, 2020 - Politics & Policy

In photos: Protests erupt across U.S. after Breonna Taylor decision

Protesters rally in Louisville, Kentucky, on Sept. 23 after the grand jury decision. Photo: Jeff Dean/AFP via Getty Images

Thousands of protesters rallied into the night across the U.S. in response to a grand jury's decision not to charge the three Louisville, Kentucky, police officers involved in the shooting of Breonna Taylor with murder or manslaughter.

Why it matters: The decision to indict only former officer Brett Hankison for wanton endangerment for firing shots into neighboring apartments, rather than on charges directly related to Taylor's death has triggered huge nationwide protests against racism and police brutality on a scale not seen since summer demonstrations over the death of George Floyd.

"Not enough": Protesters react to no murder charges in Breonna Taylor case

A grand jury on Wednesday indicted Brett Hankison, one of the Louisville police officers who entered Breonna Taylor's home in March, on three counts of wanton endangerment for firing shots blindly into neighboring apartments.

Details: Angering protesters, the grand jury did not indict any of the three officers involved in the botched drug raid on homicide or manslaughter charges related to the death of Taylor.