Aug 7, 2019

Podcast: The company in the middle of the U.S.-China trade war

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How Huawei is weathering U.S. sanctions

In releasing its first half results last week, Huawei touted a "robust" 23% increase in year-over-year revenue. However, the reality for the Chinese tech giant is that a number of pieces of its business are suffering thanks to U.S. pressure and sanctions.

The big picture: The U.S. has added Huawei to a list of entities with whom U.S. firms are generally banned from doing business. But the Trump administration has delayed some of the impact of its ban and also suggested it will allow U.S. companies to seek exemptions so long as national security is not threatened. It remains unclear what will and won't be allowed.

Go deeperArrowAug 7, 2019

Huawei unveils Harmony, its homegrown operating system

Huawei unveils its HarmonyOS at a developer conference on Friday. Photo: FRED DUFOUR/AFP/Getty Images

Amid uncertainty over its longterm access to Google's Android, Huawei on Friday detailed HarmonyOS, the operating system it has developed in-house over the past 2 years.

Why it matters: Huawei, which has been targeted by U.S. trade restrictions and security concerns, needs a Plan B if it loses access to Google's operating system and services. But it also faces an uphill battle in getting other key tech companies to adopt it.

Go deeperArrowAug 9, 2019

Report: Huawei employees helped African governments spy on opponents

A member of Huawei's reception staff enters a building used for high profile customer visits in Shenzhen, China. Photo: Kevin Frayer/Getty Images

Huawei employees have helped African governments spy on political opponents in at least 2 instances not disclosed to the public, the Wall Street Journal reports.

What they found: In 2018, Huawei engineers working in Uganda used spyware developed by an Israeli company to infiltrate opposition leader Bobi Wine's WhatsApp, reportedly at the request of a Ugandan cyber-surveillance unit. In Zambia, Huawei technicians "helped the government access the phones and Facebook pages of a team of opposition bloggers running a pro-opposition news site," WSJ reports.

Go deeperArrowAug 14, 2019